Security and Education for Prosperous Microfinancing in Developing Countries

cryptopolitan | May 12, 2019

Security and Education for Prosperous Microfinancing in Developing Countries
Micro-financing is a financial tool that developing countries and their citizens often address. But due to the lack of education and awareness or financial instruments, chances of fruitful interaction between banks and unbanked are low. There are several important factors which determine whether a micro-financing institution will prosper and thus help the people in a developing country. One of the most important factors, which determine the improvement of microfinance in developing countries is the level of security and data protection, lenders and borrowers are offered. To provide their clients with a sufficient level of data and privacy protection, and to offer secure arrangements, platforms like AssetStream are based on blockchain. It allows them to perform transactions through smart contracts, which are protected against outside interference, and only the parties involved can access them. One of the primary purposes of microfinancing in developing countries is to help provide funding to underbanked and unbanked people. However, getting to trust them into putting their money in an online platform may not be that easy, as they most likely do not trust financial institutions, which is why they have remained without bank accounts.

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Even when in school, children and young people are not necessarily learning and those from vulnerable groups are more likely to suffer from discrimination and to be targeted by school violence.

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EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

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businesswire | October 22, 2020

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Adobe Education Exchange Releases Valuable Distance Learning Resources

Adobe | May 05, 2020

The transition to remote learning is being made easier for colleges and universities with help from Adobe’s online platform for educators. They updated that material as necessary, and they reached out to educators they’d worked with previously and asked them what they could use the most. When the new site, Adobe Distance Learning Resources, was launched, Adobe made sure it had plenty of content on products and strategies. There isn’t a college or university in the country that hasn’t been affected by the coronavirus crisis. For many, of course, the pandemic has changed everything: Campuses have closed, students and faculty are home, and all class instruction has been shifted online. The transition hasn’t been easy, to put it mildly, and many in higher education are wondering what’s next. It’s the kind of situation, notes Brian Johnsrud, education curriculum strategy lead at Adobe, that few educators could have imagined at this time last year. But now that it’s happened, reality has set in, “and there’s an urgent need for immediate solutions.. With that in mind, Johnsrud says, his team got together back in mid-March and held a brainstorming session around what they could do to help. They focused their effort on the Adobe Education Exchange (EdEx), an online platform and community that since 2010 has provided educators with free professional development courses and resources. Learn more: ONLINE EDUCATION COMPANY COURSERA OFFERS UNEMPLOYED WORKERS THOUSANDS OF FREE COURSES. “Distance learning was already a part of that content, because even before the current closures a lot of universities had at least some online offerings,”. ~ Johnsrud says In November 2019, for example, they’d posted a course covering flipped classroom strategies and tools for helping students experience learning in nontraditional ways. “So we looked at everything and decided we could provide all of those resources in one place. Basically, we’d create a kind of distance-learning hub where an instructor could find almost anything they’d need.”The team began by curating what they already had that specifically targeted distance learning, including blog posts, videos, webinars and the like. They updated that material as necessary, and they reached out to educators they’d worked with previously and asked them what they could use the most. “Obviously, that’s really outside of academics, but it’s still an important part of the college experience. So we developed a new post on how to hold a virtual graduate showcase, and then others around things that students can do,”. ~ Adobe When the new site, Adobe Distance Learning Resources, was launched, Adobe made sure it had plenty of content on products and strategies “that have the broadest accessibility,” Johnsrud says. Adobe applications like Spark, Rush and XD all qualified because they can be used across a range of devices and don��t require a student’s institution to have a license for Adobe Creative Cloud; they also included posts linking to non-Adobe companies and organizations like Google, Microsoft and UNESCO. Today, the site features everything from a webinar by a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on how to use Creative Cloud as a “mobile makerspace” to a video on videoconferencing best practices from a lecturer in creative writing at Stanford. There’s a course on “pivoting to online teaching” that explores research-backed practices faculty and staff can use to move to distance learning “while enhancing student success and engagement,” and there’s a link to a Google Docs spreadsheet listing the distance-learning resources more than 250 universities have offered their faculty. Johnsrud’s team is adding about 30 new resources to the page every week, he notes. And they’re trying to be responsive to any feedback they receive from educators, tailoring their posts to address their needs.. Learn more: MOBILE APPLICATIONS: A GROWING TREND IN THE EDUCATION INDUSTRY .

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CONTINUING EDUCATION

University of Phoenix College of Doctoral Studies Utilizes Scholar-Practitioner-LeaderSM Learning Model

University of Phoenix | December 21, 2021

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We serve working adults who are already practitioners in their fields, and the SPL model empowers our students by helping them think critically about how they can contribute in their workplace and to their career path.” Hinrich Eylers, Ph.D., P.E., vice provost and dean of College of Doctoral Studies While a more traditional Ph.D. degree program focuses on development of new primary knowledge, the College’s practitioner doctorate focuses on the practical application of that knowledge in one’s career and community of practice. The Scholar-Practitioner-LeaderSM framework combines classical cognitive conceptions of doctoral scholarship – including high rigor of inquiry, academic study, and practical application – with the affective domains of learning. This learning model supports working adult students in the opportunity to develop a deeper awareness of who they are, how their learning is changing them, and to apply existing knowledge toward solving real-world problems in their field and community. “The doctoral program at the University of Phoenix caught my attention due to the rigor of the curriculum and the Scholar, Leader, Practitioner Model which guides the learning journey, as well as the highly engaging online learning solution allowing me to work and learn anywhere at any time,” shares Susanne Thompson, Ed.D., who completed her doctor of education with the University. “Doctoral level research is a challenging endeavor. 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A successful graduate of College of Doctoral Studies programs and the Scholar-Practitioner-LeaderSM learning model is a scholar, a curious, reflective thinker; a practitioner in their field, capable of responding quickly to emerging opportunities and diagnosing and addressing immediate and local problems; and a leader, driving innovation and creating new products and processes, ultimately advancing their community of practice. “Success is all about consistent practice and grit, and that practice is something our SPL [learning model] embraces with dedication,” shares Gina Rhodes, DHA, MBA. Rhodes completed her Doctor of Health Administration (DHA) at University of Phoenix College of Doctoral Studies. “It has taken grit and tenacity to survive the challenges of doctoral studies while working in the healthcare industry and developing the personal and academic potential of five children. Now as an empty nester, I have been able to make a positive impact in my community by helping to restructure a free-health care clinic. I am also a lifelong learner currently completing a doctoral level course on Strategic Formula and Strategic Thinking in Business.” Additionally, the three College research centers extend the development available in the classroom by establishing an active, research-oriented forum for students and faculty, and provide an avenue for faculty and students to work collaboratively on practical, real world research. The three research centers are Center for Educational and Instructional Technology Research, Center for Leadership Studies and Educational Research, and Center for Workplace Diversity and Inclusion Research. About the College of Doctoral Studies University of Phoenix’s College of Doctoral Studies focuses on today’s challenging business and organizational needs, from addressing critical social issues to developing solutions to accelerate community building and industry growth. The College’s research program puts students in the center of an effective ecosystem of experts, resources and tools to help prepare them to be a leader in their organization, industry and community. Through this program, students and researchers work with organizations to conduct research that can be applied in the workplace in real time. About University of Phoenix University of Phoenix is continually innovating to help working adults enhance their careers in a rapidly changing world. Flexible schedules, relevant courses, interactive learning, and Career Services for Life® help students more effectively pursue career and personal aspirations while balancing their busy lives.

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Spotlight

Even when in school, children and young people are not necessarily learning and those from vulnerable groups are more likely to suffer from discrimination and to be targeted by school violence.