Research review finds students who improve after school closure are 'more exception than rule'

Educationdive | February 08, 2019

Research review finds students who improve after school closure are 'more exception than rule'
A Chalkbeat review of 17 school closure studies published over the last 10 years, focused on how those closures affected students’ academic performance, examines the impact these events have on students future achievement. The findings reveal that the displaced students’ graduation rates and college enrollment rates typically drop, along with immediate test scores — though that difference faded after three years. Not too surprisingly, some students who end up in higher-performing schools do better academically, but these scenarios are "more exception than rule," Chalkbeat reports.There are also negative impacts on students in schools that receive an influx of displaced students, and there's very little research into how future students fare when a school is closed. Sometimes schools close because they have low enrollment. Other times, closures are due to underperformance. Despite the reasons, the research suggests students typically suffer when schools close. While schools with a higher enrollment of students of color and low-income students are more likely to be shut down for poor performance, the majority of those students don’t end up in better schools — though those who do may see academic success, according to the Center for Research and Education Outcomes.

Spotlight

Professional learning is more than just a check-the-box, one-and-done solution. It’s about building a system that truly impacts the way teachers develop skills and pedagogy, that in turn, impacts student success.Here are at least 5 ways a K-12 learning management system (LMS) can help to establish an engaging, efficient, fun, and successful professional learning program.

 

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Pandemic shifts highlight the significance of differentiated learning technology

ASCD | May 07, 2020

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Ascent Student Loans Launches New Scholarship for Students Focused on Supporting Social Causes

Ascent | July 16, 2020

Ascent Funding, LLC (Ascent Student Loans and Skills Fund), an award-winning education finance company, announced today's launch of a new $1,000 monthly, no-essay scholarship opportunity for students focused on supporting social causes that motivate them. Students can enter on AscentStudentLoans/SocialCauseScholarship by sharing on social media how they influence positive social changes in their local community and beyond."Students are among the biggest demographic supporting social change movements by joining peaceful protests, signing petitions, making donations, showing up to the voting polls, and sharing resources on their social media platforms," said Kim McNealy, Chief Marketing Officer of Ascent. "Our students are showing up, and now it is time for us to do our part – promoting and rewarding the positive changes they want to see in the world."For Ascent's first monthly $1,000 social cause scholarship giveaway, students are asked to share a resource on one of their social media platforms to support the fight against racism. After the winner is randomly selected on August 15th, a new social cause scholarship task will launch. (You do not need to have an Ascent or Skills Fund loan to participate, but you must be 18+ and a U.S. citizen).

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EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

STEM Learning with Video Games: Code Ninjas Debut in Hacienda Heights Teaching Kids to Code in a New Way

Code Ninjas | December 08, 2021

Code Ninjas, one of the fastest-growing kids coding franchises, is set to open their newest location at 17142 Colima Rd. Unit D on Dec. 8. Code Ninjas will serve the local area by offering computer coding courses for kids. The courses will allow kids to problem-solve while they build video games and collaborate with other children their age. This new learning center will establish an environment where kids and teens can learn about technology while having fun. The Hacienda Heights location is owned and operated by local entrepreneurs David and Irene Yu. David has 25 years of experience in IT networking while Irene spent 15 years in the pharmaceutical industry before becoming a stay-at-home mom. David and Irene tried several methods when it came to teaching their kids how to code, including online programs and coding tutors. It wasn't until Code Ninjas that they found the right fit; fun, engaging courses teaching essential skills. It was due to their positive personal experience that the Yus decided to bring Code Ninjas to Hacienda Heights. "Coding is an invaluable language for kids to learn and Code Ninjas allows for kids to hone their abilities in an interactive and social environment. Technology has made its way into almost every job and we want to give kids the skills they need to succeed. The best part about the Code Ninjas curriculum is that kids have so much fun while they learn new subjects." David Yu,Hacienda Heights Owner Hacienda Heights children (ages 5-14) can look forward to the new Code Ninjas center where they can learn how to code in a fun, safe, and social environment. At Code Ninjas, gaming is celebrated, and STEM is cool. Everything about their centers – or Dojos – are built around fun, which keeps kids coming back. The center also provides the results that parents are looking for, as their children gain coding and problem-solving skills they'll need in the evolving job market. "At Code Ninjas, kids are developing social skills in addition to learning how to problem solve," says Irene Yu. "Code Ninjas combines screen time and social interaction in a way that is productive and beneficial for kids. Making education engaging and enjoyable for them is what will truly help them succeed in school and in their future career." Code Ninjas offers a robust, game-based curriculum made up of nine belts, just like martial arts. The courses are self-paced, but not self-taught; kids get immediate help and encouragement from Code Senseis (teachers) and fellow students as they advance from white to black belt. The program keeps kids motivated with little wins along the way, and "Belt-Up" celebrations where they receive color-coded wristbands to mark their graduation to the next level. By the time a child finishes the program, they will publish their own app, available to the public in an app store. Code Ninjas also offers a variety of opportunities for children to get involved, including a flexible weeknight drop-in program, camps and Parents Night Out events on weekends. About Code Ninjas Founded in 2016, Code Ninjas® is the world's largest and fastest-growing kids coding franchise. In hundreds of Code Ninjas centers, kids ages 7-14 have fun building video games while gaining life-changing skills in coding, robotics, and problem solving. Kids have fun, parents see results®.

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Spotlight

Professional learning is more than just a check-the-box, one-and-done solution. It’s about building a system that truly impacts the way teachers develop skills and pedagogy, that in turn, impacts student success.Here are at least 5 ways a K-12 learning management system (LMS) can help to establish an engaging, efficient, fun, and successful professional learning program.