Redefining Higher Education through New-Age Innovations

digitallearning | March 29, 2019

Redefining Higher Education through New-Age Innovations
Technology, social change, and cost inflation are the three key elements posing multiple challenges to students in higher education thus laying emphasis on the need to be innovative in an educational system, usually wary of change, writes Akash Tomer of Elets News Network (ENN).Learning House and the Online Learning Consortium recently surveyed academic administrators of higher education to understand what these decision-makers are looking for right now and what lessons they’ve learnt from their implementation strategies. Majority of the surveyed individuals either called out technology specifically or gave examples of innovations that required new technology. Some of them equated innovation with the technology. A lot of higher education institutes are now taking service of resources and manpower to replace obsolete teaching-learning practices and technologies on campus with the latest innovations. But how many have a grasp of the state of innovation in the higher education space? While the implementation of new, cutting- edge tools is essential for planning innovation in any campus, decision-makers should understand what innovation means for higher education institutions to make informed decisions for a campus integrated with latest technologies, best practices and simultaneously catering to needs of primary stakeholders i.e. students.

Spotlight

There is no such thing as a “typical” day for students in Lindsay Unified School District (LUSD), located about fifty miles southeast of Fresno in California’s Central Valley. In this highly mobile rural district, where 86 percent of students qualify for free or reduced-price meals and half are learning to speak English, every day offers each of the district’s 4,191 students a unique learning experience customized to that student’s specific needs.

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Spotlight

There is no such thing as a “typical” day for students in Lindsay Unified School District (LUSD), located about fifty miles southeast of Fresno in California’s Central Valley. In this highly mobile rural district, where 86 percent of students qualify for free or reduced-price meals and half are learning to speak English, every day offers each of the district’s 4,191 students a unique learning experience customized to that student’s specific needs.