Pennsylvania higher ed system gives colleges tuition control

educationdive | April 08, 2019

The board that oversees a system of 14 public colleges in Pennsylvania has agreed to allow them to determine their own tuition plans, though they must set them for two years at a time, settle on final figures earlier in the year and receive board approval. The policy will allow the universities, which enroll roughly 100,000 students, to consider "regional economic differences," program costs and their students' ability to pay for tuition, according to a news release.The change is part of a multiyear redesign of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (Passhe) that aims to transform it into a "sharing system" in which "[t]he universities will work more closely together, expanding educational opportunities for students while ensuring the programs they offer align even more closely with workforce needs," Passhe Chancellor Daniel Greenstein said in the announcement. The flexibility to set tuition is part of the three-phase redesign of Passhe, which has seen declining enrollment for the eighth-straight year, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer. Some colleges in the state have been harder hit than others; enrollment at Mansfield University has dropped by more than 50% since 2010.

Spotlight

Recent studies suggest that top-down approaches to reducing out-of-school suspension (OSS) can be problematic. Yet when it comes to understanding the costs and/or benefits of suspensions in general, many discipline scholars believe we are at an impasse, and the public debate over discipline policy remains correspondingly polarized and two-dimensional. To escape from this methodological cul-de-sac, we asked educators what they think about school discipline (something no one had done systematically in nearly fifteen years). Specifically, we surveyed a nationally representative sample of over 1,200 grade 3–12 teachers, in partnership with the RAND Corporation.

Spotlight

Recent studies suggest that top-down approaches to reducing out-of-school suspension (OSS) can be problematic. Yet when it comes to understanding the costs and/or benefits of suspensions in general, many discipline scholars believe we are at an impasse, and the public debate over discipline policy remains correspondingly polarized and two-dimensional. To escape from this methodological cul-de-sac, we asked educators what they think about school discipline (something no one had done systematically in nearly fifteen years). Specifically, we surveyed a nationally representative sample of over 1,200 grade 3–12 teachers, in partnership with the RAND Corporation.

Related News

CORPORATE EDUCATION AND TRAINING, TALENT DEVELOPMENT

Prescient Launches Its Learning and Development Platform

Prescient | September 16, 2022

Prescient, a biopharma product and portfolio strategy firm, has announced the launch of its learning and development platform – Prescient Academy.Developing its staff is a strategic priority for Prescient, and its vision is to empower people to fulfill their potential and enable them to succeed. To this end, the firm has heavily invested in a world-class learning and development platform to elevate the capabilities of its people and become a more dynamic partner to its pharmaceutical clients.The Prescient Academy will deliver a blend of learning experiences, ranging from in-person workshops delivered across the firm's global offices to virtual or hybrid events and, crucially, a new digital platform with on-demand resources to support learning anytime, anywhere. The platform will enable Prescient team members to access on-demand digital learning from both in-house experts and external faculty; specialist content to expand their capabilities and expertise; a calendar of learning and development events so they can better plan their learning journey; and a dedicated space for social learning, where individuals can pose questions, start debates or upload content, so everyone at Prescient can continually learn from each other. "It is so exciting to be leading the Learning & Development team as we embed a culture of continuous learning,Developing people is regarded as one of the strategic levers to help Prescient achieve its ambitious growth objectives and enable us to deliver the very best solutions to our clients. I am proud of the work my team is doing, in collaboration with business leaders and subject matter experts across the firm. The platform we are building will ensure our people have the skills to perform at their very best and accelerate the performance of new joiners." Diane Whelan, Director and Head of Learning at Prescient. About Prescient Prescient® is a pharma services firm specializing in dynamic decision support and product and portfolio strategy. We partner with our clients to turn science into value by helping them understand the potential of their molecules, shaping their strategic plans and allowing their decision making to be the biggest differentiating factor in the success of their products. When companies partner with Prescient, the molecules in their hands have a greater potential for success than the same science in the hands of their competitors. Founded in 2007, Prescient is a global firm with a footprint in 10 cities across three continents. Our team of more than 500 experts partners with 27 of the top 30 biopharmaceutical companies, the fastest-growing mid-caps and cutting-edge emerging biotechs, including some of the biggest and most innovative brands. More than 80% of our employees hold advanced life sciences degrees, and our teams deliver an impressive depth of therapeutic, clinical and commercial expertise.

Read More

EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

LISC teams up with HBCUs on talent development program for students, expanded capacity for CDFIs

Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) | November 25, 2022

The Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) has launched a new internship program for students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to help bridge the opportunity gap for students of color—offering community development mentorship and experience that gives young people a leg up when entering the workforce. Over the next two years, LISC's National HBCU Talent Development program is placing 40 students in part-time intern positions with local LISC offices and other community development financial institutions (CDFIs). Interns will support a range of initiatives, from marketing to finance to community engagement, while also participating in leadership and national networking events. The program is funded by the Citi Foundation and is specifically designed to address national disparities in internships, with White students significantly more likely to gain paid versus unpaid positions than Black students. The LISC internship pays $25/hour up to $15,000 for the academic year. Talent is everywhere, but opportunity is not," noted Denise Scott, LISC president, who held a virtual "fireside" chat with the initial cohort of interns last month. This program is part of our work to address systemic racial barriers that keep young people from gaining the experience and connections they need to compete for good jobs," she explained. "Through this program, students can earn a strong wage, gain hands-on experience, work with mentors and build a network of contacts and supporters all while supporting valuable community investment activity," she continued. "It's a win for all of us. At the outset, eight HBCUs are participating in the program, with young people from varied backgrounds and experiences applying to participate. Eryn Glover, for instance, is a sophomore marketing major at Johnson C. Smith University (JCSU) in Charlotte, N.C., and one of LISC's first HBCU interns. She is working with the staff at LISC Charlotte to support fundraising, social media and community outreach, helping extend LISC's engagement with the region's philanthropic leaders and supporting valuable collaborations with local partners. I've always known that I wanted to do nonprofit work and put my skills to work to help people," said Glover, a South Jersey native who has spent recent summer breaks working at community-based organizations. She chose JCSU for her education because she wanted to attend an HBCU, benefit from a smaller university, and be close to family that had moved to North Carolina. I feel like I have opportunities here, like the LISC internship, that offer the chance to really get to know professors and mentors, and to also make a difference. I want to work in marketing within the nonprofit space, so this internship really aligns with that," she said. In Washington, D.C., Howard University senior Marsi Hailu is interning with the LISC policy team. Her early projects include mapping gaps in broadband access especially in rural communities and researching the disproportionate impact of climate events on low-income communities of color.I already knew that there is a lack of intergenerational wealth in Black and Brown communities because of historical discrimination," she said of her initial research. "But I guess I didn't realize how much that intersects with geography. It's a lot easier to recover from a disaster if you aren't already living paycheck to paycheck," she added. Hailu, a finance major from Northern Virginia, hopes to pursue a graduate degree in urban development after graduation, with a concentration in affordable housing. She said the LISC internship offers the opportunity to try her hand at different aspects of community development, going well beyond what she might learn in her finance classes. In a lot of places, housing is at the root of inequality," she said, explaining her passion for the work. "As someone who grew up in the area, I see the disparities facing low-income folks. I want to do something about that," she said. In addition to Howard and JCSU, initial HBCU supporters of the program include Edward Waters University (Florida), LeMoyne-Owen College (Tennessee), Lincoln University (Pennsylvania), Morehouse College (Georgia), Simmons College (Kentucky), and Virginia State University (Virginia). Additional HBCUs will be referring students in the months to come. LISC's Scott said the universities are eager to help students identify new opportunities for advancement—particularly given that many of the schools already have existing relationships with LISC, collaborating on local efforts related housing and economic development. "Here at Johnson C. Smith University, we strive to graduate global citizens who develop a compelling sense of social and civic responsibility for leadership and service,. "LISC's internship program is an excellent way for JCSU students to put this possibility into perspective outside of the classroom. Just as we strive to develop a better world by graduating the best and brightest, LISC does the same by investing in its community to make economic equality a reality," he said. JCSU President Clarence D. Armbrister The National HBCU Talent Development program draws on the experience of LISC's nearly three decades of work with AmeriCorps, including the Economic Mobility Corps (EMC) launched in 2020. Through EMC, LISC places national service members in positions that help build the capacity of CDFIs. We have long seen the value in connecting people to community development positions in places that they know and care about," Scott said. "Our HBCU internship program takes that a step further, focusing on gaps in opportunity for students of color, injecting equity into CDFI recruitment efforts and building a community development workforce that reflects the people and places it serves. About LISC LISC is one of the country's largest community development organizations, helping forge vibrant, resilient communities across America. We work with residents and partners to close systemic gaps in health, wealth and opportunity and advance racial equity so that people and places can thrive. Since our founding in 1979, LISC has invested $26.7 billion to create more than 463,000 affordable homes and apartments, develop 78.5 million square feet of retail, community and educational space and help tens of thousands of people find employment and improve their finances.

Read More

EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

DetectedX Introduces ImageDx to Transform Image-Based Education at RSNA

DetectedX | November 29, 2022

Building on the successful U.S. launch at the SBI/ACR Breast Imaging Symposium, DetectedX, the leaders in intelligent interactive educational technology, will showcase updates to its Radiology Online Learning Platform at the 108th Annual Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting, November 27-December 1, 2022 . At RSNA, DetectedX will launch ImageDx, a fully customizable, interactive learning platform providing users the ability to design and deliver image-based education using DetectedX's award-winning templates and approaches. Educators can leverage existing DetectedX content or load their own images, quizzes and other learning content for easily accessible and secure online learning. The next generation technology transforms the teaching and learning experience for clinicians, teachers and students alike. For more information or to schedule an appointment, visit DetectedX RSNA 2022. DetectedX announced recently that Professor László Tabár, a Nobel Prize Nominee and visionary physician, academic and educator, has joined the company as Medical Director of Breast Imaging. DetectedX will showcase the new breast imaging educational content from Professor Tabár at RSNA. To view the new education content, visit https://detectedx.com/laszlo-tabar/ With momentum building in the marketplace, DetectedX is adding a number of new users from large radiology groups, national screening centres, academic centers to individual radiologists, across the US, Europe, Middle East and Asia. In addition, the company is developing new partnerships to foster the development and delivery of the highest quality education. For example, Professors Wendie Berg and Margarita Zuley are looking forward to working with DetectedX in a new collaboration with UPMC. This exciting new collaboration will ensure that first class education is delivered to all those with an interest in breast cancer imaging. Innovative interactive technologies will blend with the world's best clinical educators to ensure that on demand education is available to anyone, anywhere 24/7. The company will also showcase new subscriber options for users across a broad range of breast imaging organizations, including Screening environments, Clinics/Radiology Providers, Universities, Private Practice Radiologist Groups and Individual Radiologists. Users can customize access to the intelligent interactive educational platform, which features micro-learning tools, including quizzes and expanded educational content and videos, as well as CME and accreditation dashboards. New learning tools will feature new breast and lung educational content, as well as Medical Physics, Radiation and Artificial Intelligence topics. Designed to improve radiologists' ability to correctly detect breast lesions in 2D and 3D Mammography, the Radiology Online Learning Platform has been proven to help clinicians improve the ability to detect and diagnose breast cancer cases, showing a 34% improvement in the accuracy of diagnosing difficult cases. DetectedX's Radiology Online Learning Platform is currently used in more than 150 countries, including national screening services, clinics and professional societies in North America, UK, Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, Slovenia, Italy and Vietnam. In addition, DetectedX has marketing and distribution partnerships with Volpara Health, Fujifilm and GE Healthcare. "Since launching into the U.S. at SBI, we have experienced tremendous momentum with new customers, new subscriber options, and exciting new educational content. We are excited to return to the U.S. and showcase the expanded DetectedX team focused on enhance our breast imaging educational content and help us improve radiology education around the world," Professor Patrick Brennan, CEO DetectedX and Chair, Diagnostic Imaging, the University of Sydney. ABOUT DETECTEDX DetectedX's Radiology Online Learning Centre, focusing on diagnostic accuracy and driven by artificial intelligence, is revolutionizing disease detection in 150 countries. The on-demand, web-based training platform has been proven to improve the accuracy of diagnosing difficult cases by 34%.

Read More