Spotlight

The brain is there to recognize again and to remember, e.g. “friend or foe” or “pleasant or dangerous” situations. A living being with a brain can survive more easily. The brain has not developed to be used for memorizing or rote learning, e. g: facts, numbers of years. That means that we do not learn because of the way our brain is built up. What we learn at school about learning contradicts in many ways the purpose of the brain. There we try to learn despite the way our brain is structured. School expects absolute knowledge.

Related News

Cylient Launches Global and Collaborative Digital Learning Version of Coaching in the Moment Training

prnewswire | September 16, 2020

Cylient today announced the global launch of Coaching in the Moment digital learning where people learn how to recognize and untie knots in everyday conversations. Knots are things that are not happening—like team members not talking about an important issue or someone not doing what is expected of them. Coaching in the Moment teaches people how to quickly identify what is stuck and use "in the moment" coaching approaches to amicably resolve issues, foster learning from everyday challenges, strengthen relationships and much more. Learners have fun as they journey together for four weeks in this collaborative, moderator-guided learning experience. With social learning, discussions, video scenarios, and real-life application of coaching approaches, the learning comes alive. An entire learning ecosphere can be created through the addition of virtual group practice sessions, the support of champions and office hours.

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Woz U Join Forces with CredEd to Provide Teachers with Necessary Education on Coding

Woz U | August 21, 2020

Woz U will be partnering with the global clearinghouse for teaching credentials, CredEd, to provide teachers with necessary education on coding. This partnership comes as the pandemic has highlighted the need for our education system to evolve, especially when it comes to technology. A recent survey shows that teachers have a strong desire for professional learning that builds comfort with technology. "With the move to online learning, people have been critical of the education system, and how schools, in some cases, have been slow to adapt," said Jacob Mayhew, CEO of Woz U. "But the reality is, teachers have not been exposed to what they're expected to teach. Through this partnership with CredEd, we aim to change that." CredEd is an online platform for teachers to access professional development courses at a reasonable cost. CredEd partners with curriculum providers and other vendors to offer professional development and continuing education units (CEU) that are pathways to certifications and renewals, and portable credits that can be applied to other programs. The courses are approved by accreditors like the National Council for Private School Accreditation (NCPSA).

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EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

Skyward Helps Districts Leverage Edtech as Digital Transformation Accelerates

Skyward | September 30, 2021

As district leaders have accelerated their reliance on technology and digital skills, it has become clear that some of the strategies and tools put in place during the last 18 months will remain in the post-COVID-19 education world. For many school districts, leveraging their use of existing technology allowed them to make digital transformation a much less stressful experience. One such district, Consolidated High School District 230 (D230) in Illinois, integrated their SIS (Skyward) with their LMS (Canvas) to help them transition to a successful virtual learning environment. While D230 already had plans in place for eLearning to be used for inclement weather days prior to the pandemic, the district had to speed up their plans when the pandemic hit. Luckily, the district's SIS easily integrates with many third-party solutions, so they were able to get their virtual learning environment up and running quickly. "The integration [of Skyward] with Canvas has made it much easier to manage changes with courses, teachers, student rosters, team teaching, and more," stated John Connolly, chief technology officer at the district. "Our teachers especially love the gradebook passback feature." Another district in Texas, Grand Prairie Independent School District, used Skyward to offer online enrollment amid the pandemic. With a student count of over 29,000, Grand Prairie ISD needed a way to enroll all students without in-person visits. Enter Skyward's New Student Online Enrollment (NSOE). According to Bill Young, the district's director of student information systems, implementing the NSOE feature created convenience and peace of mind for both district administrators and district families. "NSOE has been a great way to receive information from parents, process the information to get students enrolled, and communicate back to the parents, all with no face-to-face contact," said Young. Finally, Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township in Indiana, used Skyward to move their parent-teacher conferences online. The results surpassed expectations, with one elementary school reporting 100% participation. "A silver lining to all the negatives of the pandemic is the move of parent-teacher conferences online," said chief operations and technology officer at the district, Pete Just. "Our participation is through the roof and teachers and parents are connecting to help students in ways they never had before. Engaging the adult in the student's life is key to student success. I think online parent teacher conferences are here to stay and that's a great thing!" For D230, Grand Prairie ISD, MSD Wayne Township, and thousands of other districts around the nation, COVID-19 caused a quick pivot to remote learning with a heavier reliance on their edtech. By using Skyward in creative and innovative ways, these three districts thrived. The pandemic created a rapid acceleration in districts' move to digital solutions,For districts, leveraging edtech they already own allows them to shift to a digital environment, without having to invest in additional software or learn new tools. Ray Ackerlund, president of Skyward. While it is impossible to know what the coming years of education will look like, these examples show how districts are using their edtech to stay future-ready as they anticipate what may happen next. About Skyward Skyward's school administrative software solutions are used by more than 2,000 public sector organizations worldwide, from small entities to statewide implementations. Since 1980, Skyward has remained committed to a better experience for every user.

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Spotlight

The brain is there to recognize again and to remember, e.g. “friend or foe” or “pleasant or dangerous” situations. A living being with a brain can survive more easily. The brain has not developed to be used for memorizing or rote learning, e. g: facts, numbers of years. That means that we do not learn because of the way our brain is built up. What we learn at school about learning contradicts in many ways the purpose of the brain. There we try to learn despite the way our brain is structured. School expects absolute knowledge.