How to minimize IoT risks on education networks

edscoop | January 22, 2019

How to minimize IoT risks on education networks
The risk of attacks on education networks increases as they become more reliant on open environments and the use of mobile and “internet of things” technology. By knowing the top threats to their networks and then applying the right tools and strategies, educational institutions at all levels will be better positioned to protect the sensitive data of students, faculty and other employees.Many curriculums are now digitally based, requiring students to have access to mobile, connected devices. As a result, 40 percent of K-12 classrooms already have a 1:1 mobile device to student ratio, and it is expected that the number of students with two connected devices will grow to 30 percent by 2020. In higher education, students are coming to campus with as many as seven connected devices.Both K-12 and universities continue to grapple with bring your own device, or BYOD, policies. Furthermore, the use of these devices has created challenges around bandwidth and ensuring compliance with regulations such as CIPA, FERPA and COPPA.

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Adobe | May 05, 2020

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Microsoft | May 21, 2020

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Education Dive | July 14, 2020

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