Fortinet aims to close cyber skills gap through new education initiatives

Moneycontrol | April 15, 2019

Fortinet aims to close cyber skills gap through new education initiatives
Fortinet announced its ongoing efforts to close the cyber security skills gap by rolling out even further expanded training and education initiatives.Recent additions to the company’s education and training programming includes additional Fortinet Network Security Expert (NSE) Institute cloud certifications and the offering of its cyber security awareness training –at no cost – for individuals or organizations seeking to deploy a cybersecurity awareness training program.A 2019 Gartner survey shows the global talent shortage is now the top emerging risk facing organizations. Additionally, according to a recent workforce development survey, 59% of organizations have unfilled cybersecurity positions, with Frost & Sullivan forecasting a shortfall of 1.5 million by 2020.The Fortinet NSE Institute was created to provide broad-based training that arms participants with a foundational understanding of the threat landscape, as well as the cyber security fundamentals and skills to implement strategies and technical concepts that are in high demand.

Spotlight

A recent study found that 48% of organisations were looking for a new or different learning technology .Once you have researched the LMS options and shortlisted your preferences, take your preferred vendors’ implementation schemes into account – choosing the best LMS is not an assurance of success in itself.Whether you are implementing a new LMS from scratch or simply migrating to a new learning platform, ensure you allocate the right resources to each stage of the process. Without sufficient planning, the ability to deliver meaningful learning experiences will be difficult.

Spotlight

A recent study found that 48% of organisations were looking for a new or different learning technology .Once you have researched the LMS options and shortlisted your preferences, take your preferred vendors’ implementation schemes into account – choosing the best LMS is not an assurance of success in itself.Whether you are implementing a new LMS from scratch or simply migrating to a new learning platform, ensure you allocate the right resources to each stage of the process. Without sufficient planning, the ability to deliver meaningful learning experiences will be difficult.

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ONLINE EDUCATION

Positive Action, Inc. Enters Partnership to Distribute Content via PresenceLearning's Therapy Platform

Positive Action, Inc. | November 12, 2021

Positive Action, Inc. ("PAI"), the leading education and technology company for evidence-based social and emotional learning (SEL) programs, has entered a distribution partnership with PresenceLearning, the leading provider of live online therapy tools and special education related services for K-12 schools. "PresenceLearning's technology platform is breaking down barriers for students to access quality special education services from a live clinician. We are delighted to pair our SEL curriculum content with PresenceLearning's platform in support of the mutual objective of delivering the most effective SEL learning experience to students." Alex Allred, CEO of PAI Via PresenceLearning's platform, students log in from school or home to live teletherapy sessions with licensed clinicians. Special education related services delivered include speech-language therapy, occupational therapy, behavioral and mental health therapy, and assessments. Clinicians within PresenceLearning's network will be able to access complete digital curriculum materials from Positive Action's SEL programs, including comprehensive education materials (most with approximately 140 lessons), student activity sheets, thumbnail graphics for posters, and other visual aids. Proven effective in multiple randomized controlled trials, the Positive Action SEL program is designed for use in all tiers of instruction and includes specialized materials designed for drug education, anti-bullying, family, and counselor objectives. "The addition of Positive Action to our digital content library meaningfully expands the SEL resources available to our clinicians and school partners. Our platform facilitates a personalized therapy experience for each child, and in today's environment, incorporating SEL into therapy is vital to helping students reach their potential," said Kate Eberle Walker, CEO, PresenceLearning. About Positive Action, Inc. Positive Action, Inc. (PAI) is the leading education and technology company for evidence-based social and emotional learning (SEL) programs. Developed by founder Dr. Carol Allred beginning in 1973, our PK-12 programs are based on the intuitive philosophy that we feel good about ourselves when we do positive actions. We offer the only SEL program proven to simultaneously improve student academic achievement and behavior in multiple, multi-year randomized controlled trials, the highest standard of evidence-based education. Our programs have earned prestigious accolades from numerous institutions, including the U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Department of Justice, Harvard University, and The Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL). About PresenceLearning PresenceLearning, Inc., is the leading provider of therapy software and teletherapy services for special education related services and behavioral mental health counseling in schools. At the heart of the company is a purpose-built therapy platform, designed by clinicians for clinicians. Special education teams utilize the Therapy Essentials platform to serve children both in and out of school, leveraging PresenceLearning's national network of more than 1,500 speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, and behavioral and mental health professionals as needed to ensure that every child is served. To date PresenceLearning has delivered more than 3 million therapy sessions. Investors in the company include Bain Capital Double Impact, Catalyst Investors, Catamount Ventures, and New Markets Venture Partners.

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Investing in Rewarding Moments: Prodege acquires popular education-savings rewards business Upromise

prnewswire | June 02, 2020

Prodege, a leading online consumer-rewards platform, announced today that it has acquired Upromise, Inc., a leading college education-savings rewards business, from SLM Corporation (Sallie Mae). This acquisition furthers Prodege's mission to "Create Rewarding Moments" for its over 120 million registered members worldwide. Upromise provides unique opportunities for consumers to earn cash-back rewards for spending, shopping, dining out, and other activities, and then automatically deposit those rewards as contributions to any linked 529 Plan education savings account. Those contributions can be invested and will grow tax-free over the years, and then can be withdrawn tax-free for qualified education expenses, including tuition, fees, books and room, and board.

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The shift to online learning shows both promising trends and troubling signs

ICT | May 25, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered an abrupt transition to distance education, training and e-learning. The crisis has resulted in massive shifts to online platforms and tools for the continued delivery of learning and skills development, which have shown both promising trends. In the future, skills that can easily be acquired and strengthened via distance learning during this pandemic could change the landscape of work for the coming generation. The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered an abrupt transition to distance education, training and e-learning. The crisis has resulted in massive shifts to online platforms and tools for the continued delivery of learning and skills development, which have shown both promising trends and troubling signs. Among those signs, the evidence that, while much is being made of digital learning making access more equitable, access to online platforms doesn’t always result in equal quality learning. Women, for example, are being disproportionately cut off from distance learning due to lack of childcare or home help during the pandemic. These were among some of the main conclusions emerging from a recent E-Discussion on “Continuing online learning and skills development in times of the COVID-19 crisis”, organized by the ILO’s Skills and Employability Branch through its Global Skills for Employment Knowledge Sharing Platform. For more than two weeks, the virtual discussion drew scores of practitioners, representatives of training institutions and policy-makers from around the world who shared their experiences regarding the impact of the pandemic, highlighted challenges that have emerged for education and training and offered solutions for tackling them. Learn more: COVID-19 SUMMER TO KEEP THE OPPORTUNITY DOORS OPEN FOR EDUCATION COMPANIES . “Representatives of training institutions and policy-makers from around the world who shared their experiences regarding the impact of the pandemic, highlighted challenges that have emerged for education and training and offered solutions for tackling them.” ~ Policy-Makers say Challenges included: instructors not properly trained and prepared to deliver online courses. Difficulties in adapting TVET (Technical and Vocational Education and Training) curricula and training to online formats. Lack of access to the internet or ICT (Information and communications technology) equipment to carry out learning or training. Apprentices ready for assessment but who couldn’t be assessed due to COVID-19 issues. Students unable to access the resources necessary to continue their training because they were not familiar with online platforms. Yet, despite these challenges, students, apprentices, providers of TVET, and policy-makers are making the important changes needed when it comes to learning and acquiring skills in times of crisis. “Continuing online learning and skills development in times of the COVID-19 crisis”, organized by the ILO’s Skills and Employability Branch through its Global Skills for Employment Knowledge Sharing Platform. ” For example, in Uruguay, INEFOP (Instituto Nacional de Empleo y Formación Profesional) developed a contingency plan calling for proposals from institutions that wanted to work in distance and semi-presence courses. Based on this, a table was created to study the methodology of moving from face-to-face courses to online formats. In Bangladesh, the Skill 21 project, a joint initiative of the government and the ILO, is developing an e-campus which would be the first online learning management platform for the TVET sector in the country. In England, the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) is taking steps to ensure that, wherever possible, apprentices can continue and complete their apprenticeship, despite any break they need to take as a result of COVID-19. New forms of partnerships are also emerging. In Syria, for example, a partnership established with IECD, a development assistance organization, is being repackaged to include e-learning, and to develop videos on recent training programmes in construction, agriculture and manufacturing. In the future, skills that can easily be acquired and strengthened via distance learning during this pandemic could change the landscape of work for the coming generation. In the near-term, we need to think about the “new” skills required by industry and employers post-COVID-19 to get people back into employment quickly. These might encompass short courses and/or skill sets that are targeted. In the long-term, hiring remote workers could become more commonplace. One thing seems clear: Giving informal education a more privileged spot in the lifelong learning concept to ensure better validation of skills will be critically important when we emerge from this crisis. With the COVID-19 pandemic, the ongoing mega-experiment in distant learning demonstrates that no country has been properly prepared for such a challenge. Schools and universities in both developing and developed countries struggle with the complexity of providing equitable access to education. To address the educational crisis, the most inspiring actions have been taken by individual teachers in both rich and poor countries. Learn more: HOW THE REMOTE LEARNING PIVOT COULD SHAPE HIGHER ED IT .

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