Good Governance: The Foundation for Good Schools

| March 4, 2019

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What’s the number one problem in the charter sector? David Frank thinks it’s the lack of board governance capacity. “Strong boards would ameliorate many of the problems of practice that charter schools have, from those that are struggling to our high performing charter schools,” said Frank.As the Executive Director of the New York State Education Department (NYSED) Charter School Office in Albany, David Frank (@dfranknyc) works with senior leadership to decide which charter schools get approval to open and which schools earn the right to stay open.

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Hull College Group

Hull College Group (HCUK) is the UK’s eighth largest further education institution by income, with an annual turnover of £65m.It supports more than 30,000 students on upwards of 1,000 courses, either on college premises or via work-based learning and community programmes. At least 90 per cent of students progress to employment, further study or training within six months of course completion. *Source: Hull College Group Student Destinations Survey 2014.

OTHER ARTICLES

5 Roles That Artificial Intelligence A Game Changer In Education Industry

Article | March 5, 2020

Although we have not yet created self-aware robots such as Pepper Popular Movies 2001: A Space Odyssey and Star Wars, we have made smart and frequent use of AI technology in a wide range of applications that, while not mind-blowing as androids, still change our daily lives. One spot where artificial intelligence is ready to perform big changes (and in some cases already) is in education. While we may not see humanoid robots acting as teachers in the next decade, there are already many projects that use computer intelligence to help students and teachers gain more educational experience. Those tools are just a few of the paths here, and those that follow will shape and define the future educational experience.

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What makes online education as effective as traditional learning?

Article | March 5, 2020

There’s a large demographic of people who struggle during their traditional learning because of the commitments they have in their day to day lives. This often includes single parents, or those who are looking to further their education later in life. Many traditional learning places like colleges will help parents work around their schedule, but online learning gives the learner autonomy over where and when they learn. For those who live in smaller communities that don’t have institutions dedicated to learning, e-learning may even be the only opportunity that they have.

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Data Analytics for eLearning

Article | March 5, 2020

The rapid shift to eLearning has raised questions regarding the remote usage of online tools by students and teachers and the impact digital instruction is having on student engagement. CatchOn’s detailed trend reports reveal how and when students and teachers across the nation are using their EdTech applications and school devices, both inside and outside the classroom. CatchOn has generated these reports based on actual usage data from districts using CatchOn.

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How Immersive Technology Champions the Four C’s of Learning

Article | March 5, 2020

Using Google’s virtual reality tour creator, Google Maps Street View and VR headsets, students with disabilities were able to tour downtown Danvers at their own pace in preparation for a real-life walk around the area as part of a life skills class. It was a “low-stakes opportunity to practice critical life skills,” Jeff Liberman, the district’s technology director, tells The Hechinger Report. “VR allows students to go places and see things virtually without actually having to go there.” Beyond applications in assistive learning, the use of immersive technologies such as VR and augmented reality continues to grow in K–12 education.

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Spotlight

Hull College Group

Hull College Group (HCUK) is the UK’s eighth largest further education institution by income, with an annual turnover of £65m.It supports more than 30,000 students on upwards of 1,000 courses, either on college premises or via work-based learning and community programmes. At least 90 per cent of students progress to employment, further study or training within six months of course completion. *Source: Hull College Group Student Destinations Survey 2014.

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