FIVE BEST PRACTICES IN OPTIMIZING LEARNING EXPERIENCES FOR ORGANIZATIONS

| February 27, 2018

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The purpose of training is ultimately to improve organizational performance in order to meet business goals more effectively regardless of the industry, audience and skillset. The importance of training is never contested, however, the effectiveness of training is up for debate. Collaborative research suggests that training design, on-the-job training, and delivery style all have an impact on training and development, which directly affects organizational performance (ref. 1). Therefore organizational performance goals will not be met and learning gaps will not be filled efficiently unless the training process itself is optimized.In order to maximize organizational benefits, the learning process must be optimized. The quality of the learning experience is dependent on factors like: how the information is delivered and accessed, what information is present and to whom, how the information is applied and assessed, and how it can be accessed or revisited in the future.

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Created and supported by educators, Sapling Learning’s instructional online homework drives student success and saves educators’ time. Our proven online homework software and integrated eBooks is currently used by over 200,000 college and high school students for learning chemistry, physics, astronomy, and economics.Because Sapling Learning was founded by educators, our sales and Technology TAs focus on how Sapling Learning actually works in the classroom.

OTHER ARTICLES

Making remote learning effective and engaging with Microsoft Education resources

Article | March 12, 2020

In the weeks since the COVID-19 outbreak first hit China, our education customers in the region have done amazing things to keep students learning while they transition to learning remotely. From eLearning innovations to keeping students’ spirits high with photo and cooking challenges, teachers and students have shown extraordinary resilience during this difficult time. Now, as countries around the world take steps to contain the virus, many schools and universities globally are moving classes online. However, teaching and learning from home is a big change for most students and Educators. Without a physical classroom, how can you check that students are engaged and progressing? How do Educators and faculty stay connected?

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What is the Future for AI in EdTech

Article | April 27, 2020

Education Technology, or EdTech as it is colloquially known as is a term that refers to the practice of deploying technology to impart education. As it is highly adaptive and progressive; the education industry has always adopted new technologies, quite readily. Many types of education are already commonly used for educational purposes. These include search engines, live webinars, video streaming, and even specialized training applications.

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Back to school after lockdown – tips from an NHS Psychologist

Article | October 1, 2020

Since some schools across the UK have started to re-open in phases, it’s opened up a whole new set of questions for families. What will it be like for our kids? How will my child adjust to school after months at home? As well as adjusting academically to full-time education again, the emotional impact will be big too. We spoke to NHS Senior Clinical Psychologist, Dr Shreena Ghelani, about how parents can help their get kids ready to return to school, whenever that might be. Here’s what she had to say: Prepare in advance Before it’s time for them to go back, keep school in the minds of your kids – drive past the school if you can so that they can see that it’s still there. When they’ve been given a return date, treat it like the beginning of the school year. Do a test run of getting ready in the morning, make sure school uniform fits, practice packing bags and walking the route to school. For younger children, they may need a settling in period again – parents may have to come into the classroom and ensure their child is settled. For teenagers – use the time while they’re still at home to keep their friendships alive by video call etc. This will help make returning back to their peer group feel less unfamiliar. One step at a time Even when school re starts, you may find that children are more tired than usual by the extra demands and sensory stimulation placed on them. Ease them back in to their routine gently and wait to start other activities (clubs and activities) in a few weeks time. Manage expectations When the time comes, you’ll find you’ll feel less stressed if you know there will be bumps in the road. Allow enough space and time in a new schedule for any hiccups so that you’re not having to manage too many demands (i.e batch cook dinners before hand, don’t agree to extra activities or if possible, adopt flexible working hours). Try to notice if you’re feeling anxious about the return to school in any way and if so, spend some time thinking about it and unpicking it. If children pick up on your anxieties they may feel anxious too. Managing worry and anxiety If you know your child might struggle with going back to school, try developing a toolbox of things they can do when they are worried at school. This might include a song to sing to them selves, visualising a calm place, some affirmation cards, practicing a breathing techniques and identifying safe staff they can tell. You can make this box together and the child can take some bits with them to school. Speak to your children about the impact of Coronavirus Let children know that it is likely that other families have been impacted by the virus (whether that’s key worker parents working hard, or family bereavements). Encourage your child to be patient with and kind to other children. Talk to them about what they might still be expected to do – not hug friends, wash their hands often, not share food or toys etc. For any children with special educational needs, they might need adaptations made for them. This might include visiting the school while it’s empty to familiarise them with the space, a video call with their teacher or a more phased return than other pupils – whatever’s best for them.

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How G Suite Enterprise for Education Helps Colleges Augment Security in the Cloud

Article | March 10, 2020

Colleges and universities continue to see the potential of moving to the cloud. In fact, they’re expected to increase investments in cloud applications and infrastructure by 22.3 percent by 2023, according to research and consulting firm Ovum. Cloud-based collaboration apps, in particular, are becoming essential tools for learning and instruction on higher ed campuses. They offer features that help students and faculty efficiently communicate and work together inside and outside the classroom, which is even more critical as distance learning and online courses grow in popularity.

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Spotlight

Sapling Learning

Created and supported by educators, Sapling Learning’s instructional online homework drives student success and saves educators’ time. Our proven online homework software and integrated eBooks is currently used by over 200,000 college and high school students for learning chemistry, physics, astronomy, and economics.Because Sapling Learning was founded by educators, our sales and Technology TAs focus on how Sapling Learning actually works in the classroom.

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