Equal Opportunity Learning: Removing The Barriers In Your Corporate Training

| October 22, 2018

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Equal opportunity employment is winning over the corporate world but has it made its way to your training program yet?Follow along as we see how companies can embrace inclusiveness and break down the barriers to equal opportunity corporate training.An estimated 2% to 3% of the population in the EU [1] and the US [2] has a seeing difficulty. In Europe, this amounts to 30 million people with limited vision (and 2.5 million blind people), a large number of which are employed. The numbers get even larger when we account for less severe, but still impactful conditions such as near-sightedness, presbyopia, and astigmatism.Vision problems can be a significant barrier to learning for many employees. Fortunately, there are several ways to make your training program more accessible to people with seeing difficulties. To cater to employees with high levels of visual impairment, you should ensure that your eLearning platform supports Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) standards, such as WCAG 2.0. These ensure compatibility with screen readers and assistive software, and allow for accessing textual and time-based content with alternative methods.For lighter cases, such as nearsightedness and presbyopia (which are extremely common in certain eye-straining occupations), it’s crucial that your eLearning content offers good typography with big, clear fonts and high contrast between foreground and background. Offering accessibility options isn’t just the right thing to do, but also mandatory in most places. In the U.S., for example, it's required by the Section 508 laws and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

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NexLearn

NexLearn, a leading provider of customized immersive learning simulations and e-Learning courseware for business, academic, and government education.SimWriter, NexLearn’s rapid development immersive learning simulation authoring tool, wins the coveted 2009 Brandon Hall Gold Award for Best Advance in Technology for Game or Simulation Authoring. Built by creators of simulations for creators of simulations.

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Article | August 20, 2020

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Spotlight

NexLearn

NexLearn, a leading provider of customized immersive learning simulations and e-Learning courseware for business, academic, and government education.SimWriter, NexLearn’s rapid development immersive learning simulation authoring tool, wins the coveted 2009 Brandon Hall Gold Award for Best Advance in Technology for Game or Simulation Authoring. Built by creators of simulations for creators of simulations.

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