Crafting Next-level Digital Learning Experience

| July 14, 2019

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Today’s students seek swift and easy connectivity with internet and resources, anytime and anywhere. The ubiquity of digital information and all-time connectivity facilitates greater collaboration, delivers immersive learning experiences, enhances the learning environment, drives personalized feedback and improved mentoring.

Spotlight

321insight

321insight offers on-demand video content, specifically designed for K-12 schools. 321insight's products include Trauma Informed Schools, a training toolkit for schools to build a culture of care and help all staff become trauma-informed, and ParaSharp, a toolkit designed to increase paraeducator effectiveness with a collection of concise, relevant, and digestible videos and tools for paraeducators, focused on common challenges they face. All 321insight content is created by experts and practitioners, and is research-based.TRAUMA INFORMED schools combines foundational videos and resources, with role-specific tools to learn about and then apply a trauma-informed lens to daily practice in schools. Topics include Adverse Childhood Experiences, Resiliency, Regulation Strategies, The Crisis Cycle, and Building a Trauma-Informed Classroom. The solution includes tools for all roles in a school; principals, teachers, specialists, office staff, custodial staff, bus drivers, and more.

OTHER ARTICLES

Preparing Your High School Student for a Career

Article | August 3, 2020

During this important time in your high school student’s life, they’re just beginning to explore their interests and the possible career paths. Your support is vital to making that exploration comfortable and exciting. To aid you in your student’s journey, here are several ways you can prepare your high school student for the career of their dreams: As your student goes through high school, they will begin exploring career paths, joining clubs and organizations and participating in extracurricular activities.

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Getting Your School Board on Board for Educational Tech

Article | August 3, 2020

School boards play a critical role when it comes to implementing new initiatives such as educational technology programs and deployments. They typically hold the purse strings for K–12 school districts and are responsible for making sure funds are allocated in a way that best meets district needs and learning objectives. But getting school boards to approve funding for new tech isn’t so easy. Administrators and IT leaders must keep in mind that school boards are balancing budgets and technology requests but may not be experts in the technologies presented to them.

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Back to school after lockdown – tips from an NHS Psychologist

Article | August 3, 2020

Since some schools across the UK have started to re-open in phases, it’s opened up a whole new set of questions for families. What will it be like for our kids? How will my child adjust to school after months at home? As well as adjusting academically to full-time education again, the emotional impact will be big too. We spoke to NHS Senior Clinical Psychologist, Dr Shreena Ghelani, about how parents can help their get kids ready to return to school, whenever that might be. Here’s what she had to say: Prepare in advance Before it’s time for them to go back, keep school in the minds of your kids – drive past the school if you can so that they can see that it’s still there. When they’ve been given a return date, treat it like the beginning of the school year. Do a test run of getting ready in the morning, make sure school uniform fits, practice packing bags and walking the route to school. For younger children, they may need a settling in period again – parents may have to come into the classroom and ensure their child is settled. For teenagers – use the time while they’re still at home to keep their friendships alive by video call etc. This will help make returning back to their peer group feel less unfamiliar. One step at a time Even when school re starts, you may find that children are more tired than usual by the extra demands and sensory stimulation placed on them. Ease them back in to their routine gently and wait to start other activities (clubs and activities) in a few weeks time. Manage expectations When the time comes, you’ll find you’ll feel less stressed if you know there will be bumps in the road. Allow enough space and time in a new schedule for any hiccups so that you’re not having to manage too many demands (i.e batch cook dinners before hand, don’t agree to extra activities or if possible, adopt flexible working hours). Try to notice if you’re feeling anxious about the return to school in any way and if so, spend some time thinking about it and unpicking it. If children pick up on your anxieties they may feel anxious too. Managing worry and anxiety If you know your child might struggle with going back to school, try developing a toolbox of things they can do when they are worried at school. This might include a song to sing to them selves, visualising a calm place, some affirmation cards, practicing a breathing techniques and identifying safe staff they can tell. You can make this box together and the child can take some bits with them to school. Speak to your children about the impact of Coronavirus Let children know that it is likely that other families have been impacted by the virus (whether that’s key worker parents working hard, or family bereavements). Encourage your child to be patient with and kind to other children. Talk to them about what they might still be expected to do – not hug friends, wash their hands often, not share food or toys etc. For any children with special educational needs, they might need adaptations made for them. This might include visiting the school while it’s empty to familiarise them with the space, a video call with their teacher or a more phased return than other pupils – whatever’s best for them.

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Boston Dynamics’ Handle robot recreated with Raspberry Pi

Article | August 3, 2020

You in the community seemed so impressed with this recent Boston Dynamics–inspired build that we decided to feature another. This time, maker Harry was inspired by Boston Dynamics’ research robot Handle, which stands 6.5 ft tall, travels at 9 mph and jumps 4 feet vertically. Here’s how Harry made his miniature version, MABEL (Multi Axis Balancer Electronically Levelled). MABEL has individually articulated legs to enhance off-road stability, prevent it from tipping, and even make it jump (if you use some really fast servos). Harry is certain that anyone with a 3D printer and a “few bits” can build one.

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Spotlight

321insight

321insight offers on-demand video content, specifically designed for K-12 schools. 321insight's products include Trauma Informed Schools, a training toolkit for schools to build a culture of care and help all staff become trauma-informed, and ParaSharp, a toolkit designed to increase paraeducator effectiveness with a collection of concise, relevant, and digestible videos and tools for paraeducators, focused on common challenges they face. All 321insight content is created by experts and practitioners, and is research-based.TRAUMA INFORMED schools combines foundational videos and resources, with role-specific tools to learn about and then apply a trauma-informed lens to daily practice in schools. Topics include Adverse Childhood Experiences, Resiliency, Regulation Strategies, The Crisis Cycle, and Building a Trauma-Informed Classroom. The solution includes tools for all roles in a school; principals, teachers, specialists, office staff, custodial staff, bus drivers, and more.

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