Changes in K-12 Education

| November 17, 2016

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It is generally assumed by educators that the K-12 curriculum – the curriculum used in primary, elementary, and secondary education – will affect students’ post-secondary educational experiences and their ability to enter the workforce. The content of the K-12 curriculum provides students with foundational knowledge and skills which are then built up at the post-secondary level. K-12 education is also intended to develop students’ general academic skills, such as reading comprehension, writing ability, researching ability, and presentation skills. These skills are also further developed in post-secondary education, which most British Columbia high school students will undertake at some point (Heslop, 2016).

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IMD Business School

IMD is an independent business school, with Swiss roots and global reach, expert in developing leaders and transforming organizations to create ongoing impact. As a leader, you may know how to be effective in theory, but it is all too easy in a pressurized environment to slip into habitual, less helpful behaviors that quickly drain your energy. It is different knowing what you need to do and actually doing it. This is the knowing-doing gap.

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