Can AI transform the education system?

| February 22, 2019

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As new technologies have emerged over the years, 'technophobia' has remained a well-trodden path of public debate throughout modern history. For example, when the first cars emerged on the US market around the early 20th century, the Farmers' Anti-Automobile Society of Pennsylvania proposed amendments to legislation, including that drivers should entirely dismantle and conceal their cars in nearby bushes, were a horse unwilling to pass by.

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UMass Dartmouth

One of the five campuses of the Public University of Massachusetts Enrollment:8,916 Undergraduate, Graduate & Continuing Education students Undergraduate enrollment:7,295 Graduate & Law enrollment :1,621 Students enrolled in online degree programs:395 95% of full-time faculty hold highest degree in their fields Alumni:44,641 Average class size:24 Male/Female ratio 51:49 MA residents:86% Full-time faculty:392 Courses offered:1718 per semester Living on Campus:4,168 Student Clubs & Organizations:151 Student Athletes:485 Main campus: 13 buildings, 122 classrooms, 113 labs & studios; 710-acres on the SouthCoast of Massachusetts, between Providence, RI and Cape Cod—just one hour from Boston.

OTHER ARTICLES

Virtual Reality Advances Bring New Possibilities to Higher Education

Article | February 19, 2020

What if virtual reality is more than a novelty or even a tool? What if it’s a technology with the potential to change, well, everything? When Emory Craig and Maya Georgieva, both experienced educators, first encountered modern VR at the Tribeca Film Festival several years ago, the experience was so revolutionary that it altered the course of their professional lives. The pair went on to establish Digital Bodies, an organization dedicated to researching and consulting on the transformative power of VR, augmented reality and artificial intelligence — collectively referred to as extended reality, or XR — in education and society.

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Removing Late Payments From Your Credit Report

Article | August 11, 2020

In 2020, most people have countless monthly expenses, and it can be too easy to miss a payment. Missing repeated payments can be extremely damaging to your credit score, which can reduce your chances of being accepted for loans and credit cards. It can happen to the best of us, and thankfully, it’s not the end of the world. There are ways you can remove late payments from your credit report – keep reading to find out how.

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Back to school after lockdown – tips from an NHS Psychologist

Article | October 1, 2020

Since some schools across the UK have started to re-open in phases, it’s opened up a whole new set of questions for families. What will it be like for our kids? How will my child adjust to school after months at home? As well as adjusting academically to full-time education again, the emotional impact will be big too. We spoke to NHS Senior Clinical Psychologist, Dr Shreena Ghelani, about how parents can help their get kids ready to return to school, whenever that might be. Here’s what she had to say: Prepare in advance Before it’s time for them to go back, keep school in the minds of your kids – drive past the school if you can so that they can see that it’s still there. When they’ve been given a return date, treat it like the beginning of the school year. Do a test run of getting ready in the morning, make sure school uniform fits, practice packing bags and walking the route to school. For younger children, they may need a settling in period again – parents may have to come into the classroom and ensure their child is settled. For teenagers – use the time while they’re still at home to keep their friendships alive by video call etc. This will help make returning back to their peer group feel less unfamiliar. One step at a time Even when school re starts, you may find that children are more tired than usual by the extra demands and sensory stimulation placed on them. Ease them back in to their routine gently and wait to start other activities (clubs and activities) in a few weeks time. Manage expectations When the time comes, you’ll find you’ll feel less stressed if you know there will be bumps in the road. Allow enough space and time in a new schedule for any hiccups so that you’re not having to manage too many demands (i.e batch cook dinners before hand, don’t agree to extra activities or if possible, adopt flexible working hours). Try to notice if you’re feeling anxious about the return to school in any way and if so, spend some time thinking about it and unpicking it. If children pick up on your anxieties they may feel anxious too. Managing worry and anxiety If you know your child might struggle with going back to school, try developing a toolbox of things they can do when they are worried at school. This might include a song to sing to them selves, visualising a calm place, some affirmation cards, practicing a breathing techniques and identifying safe staff they can tell. You can make this box together and the child can take some bits with them to school. Speak to your children about the impact of Coronavirus Let children know that it is likely that other families have been impacted by the virus (whether that’s key worker parents working hard, or family bereavements). Encourage your child to be patient with and kind to other children. Talk to them about what they might still be expected to do – not hug friends, wash their hands often, not share food or toys etc. For any children with special educational needs, they might need adaptations made for them. This might include visiting the school while it’s empty to familiarise them with the space, a video call with their teacher or a more phased return than other pupils – whatever’s best for them.

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What has a global crisis taught us about the future of higher education?

Article | June 29, 2020

The public response during COVID-19 has demonstrated both the perpetual value of education and a renewed appreciation of Australia’s research capability and expertise. At a time when everything has been stripped back to basics and our understanding of ‘essential services’ has been redefined, university education and research have endured.

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Spotlight

UMass Dartmouth

One of the five campuses of the Public University of Massachusetts Enrollment:8,916 Undergraduate, Graduate & Continuing Education students Undergraduate enrollment:7,295 Graduate & Law enrollment :1,621 Students enrolled in online degree programs:395 95% of full-time faculty hold highest degree in their fields Alumni:44,641 Average class size:24 Male/Female ratio 51:49 MA residents:86% Full-time faculty:392 Courses offered:1718 per semester Living on Campus:4,168 Student Clubs & Organizations:151 Student Athletes:485 Main campus: 13 buildings, 122 classrooms, 113 labs & studios; 710-acres on the SouthCoast of Massachusetts, between Providence, RI and Cape Cod—just one hour from Boston.

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