Better Engagement Through eLearning Automation

| October 17, 2018

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Students like to be in control of their learning. They want to choose what’s interesting and relevant, and to receive support when they need it and independence when they don’t. More importantly, students perform better in situations that consider their learning styles, preferences, and areas of interest.As the focus on personalizing learning increases, more opportunities have become available for personalization with technology. Learning Management Systems are increasingly offering support for concepts like personal learning paths, and even integrations with third-party systems through tools like Zapier, or even marketing automation tools like Infusionsoft.Automation is still an emerging concept in eLearning, but you probably already use it to some degree in your existing programs. A simple example is automatically grading quizzes and tests as users complete them. By automating this process, it reduces admin time spent grading and providing feedback, it means learners have immediate feedback, and frankly, this kind of automation is what users expect. Some systems might even automate processes like congratulating users for completing courses or notifying instructors that an assignment was submitted, but it’s with more complex automation workflows that things start to get interesting.

Spotlight

Enocta

Enocta is a pioneering innovative company founded in 1999 with the commitment to meet corporate e-learning needs by conjoining and managing them from a single center. Since the year 2006, Enocta has been developing comprehensive systems that administer all e-learning, training, and personal development needs of companies. With the learning management system developed by Enocta, the Enocta Learning Platform, companies can manage, besides their e-learning activities, the demand collection, planning, resource and budget management and training systems from a single point of administration.

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Back to school after lockdown – tips from an NHS Psychologist

Article | October 1, 2020

Since some schools across the UK have started to re-open in phases, it’s opened up a whole new set of questions for families. What will it be like for our kids? How will my child adjust to school after months at home? As well as adjusting academically to full-time education again, the emotional impact will be big too. We spoke to NHS Senior Clinical Psychologist, Dr Shreena Ghelani, about how parents can help their get kids ready to return to school, whenever that might be. Here’s what she had to say: Prepare in advance Before it’s time for them to go back, keep school in the minds of your kids – drive past the school if you can so that they can see that it’s still there. When they’ve been given a return date, treat it like the beginning of the school year. Do a test run of getting ready in the morning, make sure school uniform fits, practice packing bags and walking the route to school. For younger children, they may need a settling in period again – parents may have to come into the classroom and ensure their child is settled. For teenagers – use the time while they’re still at home to keep their friendships alive by video call etc. This will help make returning back to their peer group feel less unfamiliar. One step at a time Even when school re starts, you may find that children are more tired than usual by the extra demands and sensory stimulation placed on them. Ease them back in to their routine gently and wait to start other activities (clubs and activities) in a few weeks time. Manage expectations When the time comes, you’ll find you’ll feel less stressed if you know there will be bumps in the road. Allow enough space and time in a new schedule for any hiccups so that you’re not having to manage too many demands (i.e batch cook dinners before hand, don’t agree to extra activities or if possible, adopt flexible working hours). Try to notice if you’re feeling anxious about the return to school in any way and if so, spend some time thinking about it and unpicking it. If children pick up on your anxieties they may feel anxious too. Managing worry and anxiety If you know your child might struggle with going back to school, try developing a toolbox of things they can do when they are worried at school. This might include a song to sing to them selves, visualising a calm place, some affirmation cards, practicing a breathing techniques and identifying safe staff they can tell. You can make this box together and the child can take some bits with them to school. Speak to your children about the impact of Coronavirus Let children know that it is likely that other families have been impacted by the virus (whether that’s key worker parents working hard, or family bereavements). Encourage your child to be patient with and kind to other children. Talk to them about what they might still be expected to do – not hug friends, wash their hands often, not share food or toys etc. For any children with special educational needs, they might need adaptations made for them. This might include visiting the school while it’s empty to familiarise them with the space, a video call with their teacher or a more phased return than other pupils – whatever’s best for them.

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Google Lens working on a step-by-step math problem solver

Article | October 1, 2020

In this ‘APK Insight’ post, we’ve decompiled the latest version of an application that Google uploaded to the Play Store. When we decompile these files (called APKs, in the case of Android apps), we’re able to see various lines of code within that hint at possible future features. Keep in mind that Google may or may not ever ship these features, and our interpretation of what they are may be imperfect. We’ll try to enable those that are closer to being finished, however, to show you how they’ll look in the case that they do ship. With that in mind, read on.

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A Vision of AI for Joyful Education

Article | October 1, 2020

Many look to AI-powered tools to address the need to scale high-quality education and with good reason. A surge in educational content from online courses, expanded access to digital devices, and the contemporary renaissance in AI seem to provide the pieces necessary to deliver personalized learning at scale. However, technology has a poor track record for solving social issues without creating unintended harm. What negative effects can we predict, and how can we refine the objectives of AI researchers to account for such unintended consequences?

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3D-printable cases for the Raspberry Pi High Quality Camera

Article | October 1, 2020

How do we know you love it? Because the internet is now full of really awesome 3D-printable cases and add-ons our community has created in order to use their High-Quality Camera out and about…or for Octoprint…or home security…or SPACE PHOTOGRAPHY, WHAT?! We thought it would be fun to show you some of 3D designs we’ve seen pop up on sites like Thingiverse and MyMiniFactory, so that anyone with access to a 3D printer can build their own camera too!

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Spotlight

Enocta

Enocta is a pioneering innovative company founded in 1999 with the commitment to meet corporate e-learning needs by conjoining and managing them from a single center. Since the year 2006, Enocta has been developing comprehensive systems that administer all e-learning, training, and personal development needs of companies. With the learning management system developed by Enocta, the Enocta Learning Platform, companies can manage, besides their e-learning activities, the demand collection, planning, resource and budget management and training systems from a single point of administration.

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