Alternative Education and Return Pathways for Out-of-School Youth in Sub-Saharan Africa

| March 6, 2019

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Being out-of-school means one has a very low chance of accessing relevant basic knowledge and skills, and the certificates to signal them. It also erects barriers to dignified and fulfilling employment, well-being, poverty reduction and economic growth, at the household, community and national levels. The literature proposes three approaches to mitigate this problem. These include: (i) remediation through alternative education; (ii) integration into the labor market through non-formal education and/or technical, vocational education and training (TVET); and, (iii) retention of at-risk youth in school. However, there is less focus on re-entry into formal education especially at the secondary level. One of the key factors for a successful transition to work is education and training.

Spotlight

Odysseyware

Based in Chandler, Arizona, ODYSSEYWARE® is a leading provider of online curriculum and eLearning solutions for charter, public, and virtual schools in grades K-12. The comprehensive and rigorous curriculum was created with flexibility in mind and is designed to meet the academic needs of a diverse mix of students. It has proven itself effective not only as a primary curriculum, but as a solution for credit recovery, alternative, and special needs students, as well as in a blended learning environment. Used in more than 900 school districts across the country, ODYSSEYWARE provides online core courses, as well as a variety of electives, skills and placement testing, accelerated courses, and GED preparation.

OTHER ARTICLES

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Article | March 7, 2021

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Spotlight

Odysseyware

Based in Chandler, Arizona, ODYSSEYWARE® is a leading provider of online curriculum and eLearning solutions for charter, public, and virtual schools in grades K-12. The comprehensive and rigorous curriculum was created with flexibility in mind and is designed to meet the academic needs of a diverse mix of students. It has proven itself effective not only as a primary curriculum, but as a solution for credit recovery, alternative, and special needs students, as well as in a blended learning environment. Used in more than 900 school districts across the country, ODYSSEYWARE provides online core courses, as well as a variety of electives, skills and placement testing, accelerated courses, and GED preparation.

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