AI and Smart Campuses Are Among Higher Ed Tech to Watch in 2020

| December 9, 2019

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Universities see promise in AI as a means to drive student outcomes and to empower adaptive learning. While much has been said about the potential here, actual adoption hasn’t hit the mainstream: Rather, higher education stands poised at the starting gate. “People are experimenting and dabbling, but as we look at the data, we are finding that AI is influencing IT strategy at only about 13 percent of colleges and universities at this time,” says Susan Grajek, vice president for communities and research at EDUCAUSE. “Another 36 percent are tracking it, but they aren’t doing anything.”

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University of Arizona

The University of Arizona is the leading public research university in the American Southwest. The UA produces more than $600 million in annual research and is the state's only member of the prestigious Association of American Universities. This is a diverse community of people who thrive on innovation and collaboration. Our world-class faculty create discoveries that improve the human condition and fuel the state's economy. Our research enterprise provides undergraduate students with opportunities for hands-on experiences that can be found in few universities in the world. As the state's land-grant university, our research and resources enrich communities around the state and around the world.

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Spotlight

University of Arizona

The University of Arizona is the leading public research university in the American Southwest. The UA produces more than $600 million in annual research and is the state's only member of the prestigious Association of American Universities. This is a diverse community of people who thrive on innovation and collaboration. Our world-class faculty create discoveries that improve the human condition and fuel the state's economy. Our research enterprise provides undergraduate students with opportunities for hands-on experiences that can be found in few universities in the world. As the state's land-grant university, our research and resources enrich communities around the state and around the world.

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