8 Signs Of A Great eLearning Solution For Small And Medium Businesses (SMBs)

| January 21, 2019

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Is there a one-size-fits-all training solution for both enterprise and small business training? We bet you know the answer; It’s no. In this article, we’ll break down the specific LMS features for SMBs that are too important to keep secret.When it comes to choosing an LMS for a small or medium business, it’s easy to base your choice on the number of features (the more, the better) and overlook basic capabilities that aren’t splashed all over eLearning magazines and online communities. Here are some expert pointers that will help you quickly focus your selection process.For some companies, it’s no sweat to pay $1000 a month; for others, even $100 is above budget. The concept of “cost-effective” has many interpretations, so the goal is to find a vendor with transparent pricing.Some LMS providers require you to schedule live demos or presentations before they’ll give you ANY numbers. The problem is, you don’t know what to expect after a 30-minute product tour; it might be a good deal or just another waste of time since the offer is a budget buster anyway. If pricing is not published, there’s probably a reason why.

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OTHER ARTICLES

Best VR Apps and Games to Help your Kids Learn in 2020

Article | April 14, 2020

The best educational VR games and apps turn the world into a classroom. These incredible experiences encourage children to explore new cultures, conduct experiments, create dynamic artwork, challenge their minds, and visit places they may never see in person. Our top choice, Google's Tilt Brush, encourages creativity without ever feeling like work: the ideal for child-centric content. This guide lays out the best VR-based activities, field trips, brain-bending games, and thought-provoking films most likely to inspire and educate your kids.

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How Amie launched a new career in IT during COVID-19

Article | July 20, 2020

We’d like to introduce you to Amie Hanbury. In the story she shares below, Amie describes how COVID-19 caused her to reevaluate her career, and how learning on Coursera gave her both the confidence and the skills to pursue a new opportunity. With the support of her family, and driven by a desire to make a positive difference in the world, she overcame her self-doubts and landed a fulfilling new role in a new field.

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It’s 2020, so where’s our virtual and augmented learning?

Article | February 12, 2020

Augmented and virtual reality holds great promise for education. In schools, it could allow students conduct science experiments without science labs; in workplace training, new platforms like Mira could allow remote guidance when, for instance, engineers are working in the field. Seeing is Believing, a new report from PwC economists in the United Kingdom, says that AR and VR could deliver a $1.5 trillion (€1.4 trillion) boost to the global economy by 2030, including a $294 billion (269 billion) boost to global GDP by supporting education and training when it is not always practical or safe to do in the real world.

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Back to school after lockdown – tips from an NHS Psychologist

Article | October 1, 2020

Since some schools across the UK have started to re-open in phases, it’s opened up a whole new set of questions for families. What will it be like for our kids? How will my child adjust to school after months at home? As well as adjusting academically to full-time education again, the emotional impact will be big too. We spoke to NHS Senior Clinical Psychologist, Dr Shreena Ghelani, about how parents can help their get kids ready to return to school, whenever that might be. Here’s what she had to say: Prepare in advance Before it’s time for them to go back, keep school in the minds of your kids – drive past the school if you can so that they can see that it’s still there. When they’ve been given a return date, treat it like the beginning of the school year. Do a test run of getting ready in the morning, make sure school uniform fits, practice packing bags and walking the route to school. For younger children, they may need a settling in period again – parents may have to come into the classroom and ensure their child is settled. For teenagers – use the time while they’re still at home to keep their friendships alive by video call etc. This will help make returning back to their peer group feel less unfamiliar. One step at a time Even when school re starts, you may find that children are more tired than usual by the extra demands and sensory stimulation placed on them. Ease them back in to their routine gently and wait to start other activities (clubs and activities) in a few weeks time. Manage expectations When the time comes, you’ll find you’ll feel less stressed if you know there will be bumps in the road. Allow enough space and time in a new schedule for any hiccups so that you’re not having to manage too many demands (i.e batch cook dinners before hand, don’t agree to extra activities or if possible, adopt flexible working hours). Try to notice if you’re feeling anxious about the return to school in any way and if so, spend some time thinking about it and unpicking it. If children pick up on your anxieties they may feel anxious too. Managing worry and anxiety If you know your child might struggle with going back to school, try developing a toolbox of things they can do when they are worried at school. This might include a song to sing to them selves, visualising a calm place, some affirmation cards, practicing a breathing techniques and identifying safe staff they can tell. You can make this box together and the child can take some bits with them to school. Speak to your children about the impact of Coronavirus Let children know that it is likely that other families have been impacted by the virus (whether that’s key worker parents working hard, or family bereavements). Encourage your child to be patient with and kind to other children. Talk to them about what they might still be expected to do – not hug friends, wash their hands often, not share food or toys etc. For any children with special educational needs, they might need adaptations made for them. This might include visiting the school while it’s empty to familiarise them with the space, a video call with their teacher or a more phased return than other pupils – whatever’s best for them.

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Spotlight

Distance Learning Systems

Distance Learning systems is one of the nation's leading online learning platform with over 20,000 enrolled individuals pursuing a degree nationwide. Distance Learning Systems is the first to offer customized educational solutions and programs that provide college credits transferable to thousands of U.S. colleges and universities as well as many international institutions.

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