5 Parenting Tips for Helping School Kids

| December 12, 2018

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You know that it is the kids' responsibility to be diligent at school. But is there something that is bothering you about their promptness or enthusiasm to do academic work at home? Forget the stereotypical chiding. It does not work with pampered or rebellious kids especially. How to provide a conducive environment for your children to study at home?

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Back to school after lockdown – tips from an NHS Psychologist

Article | October 1, 2020

Since some schools across the UK have started to re-open in phases, it’s opened up a whole new set of questions for families. What will it be like for our kids? How will my child adjust to school after months at home? As well as adjusting academically to full-time education again, the emotional impact will be big too. We spoke to NHS Senior Clinical Psychologist, Dr Shreena Ghelani, about how parents can help their get kids ready to return to school, whenever that might be. Here’s what she had to say: Prepare in advance Before it’s time for them to go back, keep school in the minds of your kids – drive past the school if you can so that they can see that it’s still there. When they’ve been given a return date, treat it like the beginning of the school year. Do a test run of getting ready in the morning, make sure school uniform fits, practice packing bags and walking the route to school. For younger children, they may need a settling in period again – parents may have to come into the classroom and ensure their child is settled. For teenagers – use the time while they’re still at home to keep their friendships alive by video call etc. This will help make returning back to their peer group feel less unfamiliar. One step at a time Even when school re starts, you may find that children are more tired than usual by the extra demands and sensory stimulation placed on them. Ease them back in to their routine gently and wait to start other activities (clubs and activities) in a few weeks time. Manage expectations When the time comes, you’ll find you’ll feel less stressed if you know there will be bumps in the road. Allow enough space and time in a new schedule for any hiccups so that you’re not having to manage too many demands (i.e batch cook dinners before hand, don’t agree to extra activities or if possible, adopt flexible working hours). Try to notice if you’re feeling anxious about the return to school in any way and if so, spend some time thinking about it and unpicking it. If children pick up on your anxieties they may feel anxious too. Managing worry and anxiety If you know your child might struggle with going back to school, try developing a toolbox of things they can do when they are worried at school. This might include a song to sing to them selves, visualising a calm place, some affirmation cards, practicing a breathing techniques and identifying safe staff they can tell. You can make this box together and the child can take some bits with them to school. Speak to your children about the impact of Coronavirus Let children know that it is likely that other families have been impacted by the virus (whether that’s key worker parents working hard, or family bereavements). Encourage your child to be patient with and kind to other children. Talk to them about what they might still be expected to do – not hug friends, wash their hands often, not share food or toys etc. For any children with special educational needs, they might need adaptations made for them. This might include visiting the school while it’s empty to familiarise them with the space, a video call with their teacher or a more phased return than other pupils – whatever’s best for them.

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Using Google Ads To Increase Student Digital Engagement

Article | June 8, 2020

On average, prospective students engage with more than 1,000 digital touchpoints while researching programs in a 6-week period before filling out a lead form. With prospective students moving through different stages of their research funnel and using multiple platforms in the process, understanding the type of audience categories that Google Ads has to offer will provide the clarity you need to make smarter strategic decisions that will help you increase digital engagement. This also allows you to better anticipate your prospects’ interests and preferences while delivering the right marketing message at exactly the right time, whether you’re using Search, Display, or YouTube.

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Exact Path Successes During School Closures and Virtual Learning

Article | August 19, 2020

At Edmentum, we are so proud to be surrounded by a network of educators that are open to sharing their expertise and best practices in response to enormous challenges. This past spring and summer were no exception. As a result, we’ve collected stories of success, transition, and creative ingenuity to keep students learning and achieving academic growth. Dig into some of the top tips and stories shared with us, then tell us your experience with us by tagging @edmentum on your favorite social platform.

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The Importance of Communication Models in Education

Article | February 23, 2020

Communication has always been an integral part of the education sector which has made it be a better place for our students and teachers. Besides, the education sector, every industry highly depends on the model of communication to facilitate their processes and execute them accordingly. Well, communication models can be simply be referred to as the diagrammatic presentation of the communication process. In other words, it is the visual representation of the entire process of communication. The goal of the communication model has always been to develop communication skills and boost its efficiency between the students and teachers. The message flows from the communicator or the sender to the receiver who gives the feedback.

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Spotlight

Ed Map, Inc.

Ed Map is a Content Strategy and Logistics company. Our products and services allow institutions to find, manage, and deliver innovative and engaging course content. Today, course materials are increasingly plentiful – and options are increasingly complex. Through its client focus, industry knowledge and technology, Ed Map simplifies the discovery, adoption, management and delivery of quality educational content.

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