4 Features of Adobe Captivate that Facilitate Effective Mobile Learning Development

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Adobe Captivate offers tons of features for courseware designers to create good e-learning modules. Be it custom e-learning development, rapid authoring, or simulation-based modules, e-learning created using Adobe Captivate is of top quality that keeps learners engaged and makes learning efficient. Another important feature of Captivate that sets it apart from its counterparts is the support for creating mobile learning courses.Learning through mobile is one of the biggest trends to have hit the corporate world in recent times.

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ICS Learning Group

ICS Learning Group is a leading provider of bespoke eLearning solutions and the Inquisiq and Asentia Learning Management System. We specialize in custom content development, learning management system (LMS) implementation, SCORM/xAPI consultation, instructional design...and pretty much everything else related to eLearning.Want to nurture your own development efforts? We have worked with many authoring tools and can help you determine which of those tools to consider based on your desired outcome.

OTHER ARTICLES

Back to school after lockdown – tips from an NHS Psychologist

Article | October 1, 2020

Since some schools across the UK have started to re-open in phases, it’s opened up a whole new set of questions for families. What will it be like for our kids? How will my child adjust to school after months at home? As well as adjusting academically to full-time education again, the emotional impact will be big too. We spoke to NHS Senior Clinical Psychologist, Dr Shreena Ghelani, about how parents can help their get kids ready to return to school, whenever that might be. Here’s what she had to say: Prepare in advance Before it’s time for them to go back, keep school in the minds of your kids – drive past the school if you can so that they can see that it’s still there. When they’ve been given a return date, treat it like the beginning of the school year. Do a test run of getting ready in the morning, make sure school uniform fits, practice packing bags and walking the route to school. For younger children, they may need a settling in period again – parents may have to come into the classroom and ensure their child is settled. For teenagers – use the time while they’re still at home to keep their friendships alive by video call etc. This will help make returning back to their peer group feel less unfamiliar. One step at a time Even when school re starts, you may find that children are more tired than usual by the extra demands and sensory stimulation placed on them. Ease them back in to their routine gently and wait to start other activities (clubs and activities) in a few weeks time. Manage expectations When the time comes, you’ll find you’ll feel less stressed if you know there will be bumps in the road. Allow enough space and time in a new schedule for any hiccups so that you’re not having to manage too many demands (i.e batch cook dinners before hand, don’t agree to extra activities or if possible, adopt flexible working hours). Try to notice if you’re feeling anxious about the return to school in any way and if so, spend some time thinking about it and unpicking it. If children pick up on your anxieties they may feel anxious too. Managing worry and anxiety If you know your child might struggle with going back to school, try developing a toolbox of things they can do when they are worried at school. This might include a song to sing to them selves, visualising a calm place, some affirmation cards, practicing a breathing techniques and identifying safe staff they can tell. You can make this box together and the child can take some bits with them to school. Speak to your children about the impact of Coronavirus Let children know that it is likely that other families have been impacted by the virus (whether that’s key worker parents working hard, or family bereavements). Encourage your child to be patient with and kind to other children. Talk to them about what they might still be expected to do – not hug friends, wash their hands often, not share food or toys etc. For any children with special educational needs, they might need adaptations made for them. This might include visiting the school while it’s empty to familiarise them with the space, a video call with their teacher or a more phased return than other pupils – whatever’s best for them.

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Beacon-Based Educational Solutions: Secure Students And Assets

Article | October 1, 2020

What seemed impossible once is all happening today, thanks to one little device that is doing wonders in each arena. Beacons and proximity marketing have revolutionized the way organizations work, be it any size, any segment. The very competency of beacons to communicate information to nearby mobile devices based on their location and proximity to other beacons is the key to their success. It helps decrease the virtual distance between physical objects. One such domain that has been enjoying the wonderful advantages that beacons offer is the education domain. As it is, it's an arena of happenings with lots of newer advancements coming up and, hence, the right place to leverage the potential of beacons.

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CONTINUING EDUCATION

5 Ways to Help Women Achieve Educational Success

Article | October 1, 2020

While the pandemic continues to wreak havoc on our economy, women continue to be disproportionately impacted. Now is the time to look at the long game. What changes can society make in order to insure that when the next big crisis happens, women don’t bear the brunt of it. Education, of course, has always been on the front line of changing societal disparities. However, much of the time we don’t look at the root causes of why young women underperform in certain areas. Below are five ways we can position women for educational success, from girlhood to the moment they walk into their first job. If you are a teacher, give this list to the parents you work with. Help them set the tone now so our girls grow up ready to take on the world. DON’T TELL ME I’M PRETTY Little girls, from the time they are young, are praised for how beautiful they are.  We talk to girls about how they look and boys about what they do. This escalates when little girls hit puberty. This is when girls start deriving their social capital from their looks and their grades start to tank. Fight this trend by praising young women for what they do. Don’t say, “You’re so beautiful!” Instead say, “I love how curious you are about the solar system! You’re such an interesting person to talk to!”   DON’T TELL ME I’M SMART This sounds a little bit strange, but often little boys are praised for their hard work and girls are praised for their inherent intelligence. The problem with this is that when a little girl doesn’t do well she thinks it has to do with how smart she is rather than her work ethic. Her failures become a referendum on her intelligence.  Say, “Wow, you really worked hard” rather than, “Wow, you’re so smart!” You can always work harder, but you can’t change the brains you were born with!    DON’T BE TOO NICE TO ME When young women struggle in the sciences or STEM, often parents try to protect their feelings.  This can take the form of telling young women who are struggling that perhaps their major is just too hard --maybe they should do something that makes their life a little easier. Boys get the message not to give up - girls get the message to take the path of least resistance. Don’t coddle your girls. Hold them to the same tough standard you have with your boys.   DON’T SEE ME ONLY AS A GIRL OR A WOMAN Understand that if you are trying to support women you cannot do that in a White Woman vacuum. If a young woman you know is struggling, look at the other issues that might be intersecting. Does she have a disability? Is she a woman of color? Is she the first generation to go to college in her family? Audre Lorde famously said “there is no such thing as a single issue struggle because we do not live single issue lives.“ Make sure you are not treating every woman as if she is the same simply because of her gender. There could be all kinds of intersections that are also impacting her situation.   DO VALUE MY VOICE If you are an educator, pay attention to who you are listening to. Note how you value different voices. The patterns that impact girls and young women follow them throughout their education and into adulthood. Pay attention to who you’re calling on in class. Whose voice gets more weight? Watch for classroom dynamics that make certain people feel they have the right to speak and others feel they must remain silent. Be sure to encourage every student from kindergarten to PhD candidates to speak up and then make sure you’re listening. It’s wonderful how much weight we give to the voices of men and boys. Women should be afforded the same courtesy. Women’s success doesn’t just come from hiring women or making sure we are paid the same for doing the same work. It comes from making sure every woman, from the time she is a little girl, is given the message that she has worth, and that if she works hard enough, she can achieve her dreams. Let’s not tell our girls that they are pretty flowers who might crumble when life knocks them down. Let’s give them the message that life can be hard, but they can work harder, and if they do, success will be theirs. Eliza VanCort is an in-demand consultant, speaker, and writer on communications, career and workplace issues, and women’s empowerment. The founder of The Actor’s Workshop of Ithaca, she is also a Cook House Fellow at Cornell University, an advisory board member of the Performing Arts for Social Change, a Diversity Crew partner, and a member of Govern For America’s League of Innovators. Her first book, A Woman’s Guide to Claiming Space: Stand Tall. Raise Your Voice. Be Heard., publishes May 11, 2021.

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Preparing to Teach Online: Blending What’s New With What You Already Know

Article | October 1, 2020

This entry is the 13th in a blog series called Pandemic Response and Educational Practices (PREP), which aims to highlight and further the important work educators are doing amid the worldwide COVID-19 crisis. Based on Creating the Anywhere, Anytime Classroom. Gloria’s situation is not unfamiliar. In fact, over the last six months, millions of teachers everywhere have been asked to suddenly transition from traditional face-to-face instruction to working either fully online or in some type of blended-learning configuration.

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Spotlight

ICS Learning Group

ICS Learning Group is a leading provider of bespoke eLearning solutions and the Inquisiq and Asentia Learning Management System. We specialize in custom content development, learning management system (LMS) implementation, SCORM/xAPI consultation, instructional design...and pretty much everything else related to eLearning.Want to nurture your own development efforts? We have worked with many authoring tools and can help you determine which of those tools to consider based on your desired outcome.

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