3 Emerging Technologies That Will Disrupt The Learning Ecosystem

| January 12, 2019

article image
"Once a new technology rolls over you, if you're not part of the steamroller, you're part of the road" - by Stewart Brand. In this article, I will discuss 3 technologies that have the potential to be game changers in the learning industry.The first time I watched a 3D movie at the age of 12, I was mesmerized by the experience and literally tortured my parents to take me to that movie again and again. I was so much interested in 3D movies that I had to watch them alone as I grew up because my friends deemed such movies as fit for kids alone. I do blame my choice of movies though, as these movies were targeted at kids. But for me, it was the experience rather than the story, I would eagerly wait for those moments where I get to feel the objects closer to me, and a couple of occasions I have even chosen the front seats to check whether the experience doubles up (forgive my naivety). I loved the experience, and I am sure many would agree with me. Today, as a Learning and Development professional, I believe that learner experience plays a vital role in making our learning programs effective. And with the advent of new technologies like Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), we have the technology at our disposal to take the learning experience to such heights which we once dreamed of.

Spotlight

Vretta Inc.

The mission of Vretta is to contribute to the transformation of mathematics education by designing and developing digital products that push the boundaries of technology innovation, raising the level of numeracy for every learner. Vretta’s products include interactive formative resources that break-down concepts into micro-steps for students to visualize, conceptualize, and engage with mathematics. Secure and robust engines house interoperable assessments and questionnaires for large-scale and in-class implementation on multiple devices. Teachers have real-time data visualizations to support individual and class student success and the capacity to customize the learning and assessment experience. Administrators have powerful dashboards with actionable data to make well-informed policy decisions to reduce equity gaps and raise attainment in their jurisdictions. Vretta’s products have been credited with prestigious awards in recognition of the successful implementation of its formative,

OTHER ARTICLES

5 Ways to Help Women Achieve Educational Success

Article | March 7, 2021

While the pandemic continues to wreak havoc on our economy, women continue to be disproportionately impacted. Now is the time to look at the long game. What changes can society make in order to insure that when the next big crisis happens, women don’t bear the brunt of it. Education, of course, has always been on the front line of changing societal disparities. However, much of the time we don’t look at the root causes of why young women underperform in certain areas. Below are five ways we can position women for educational success, from girlhood to the moment they walk into their first job. If you are a teacher, give this list to the parents you work with. Help them set the tone now so our girls grow up ready to take on the world. DON’T TELL ME I’M PRETTY Little girls, from the time they are young, are praised for how beautiful they are.  We talk to girls about how they look and boys about what they do. This escalates when little girls hit puberty. This is when girls start deriving their social capital from their looks and their grades start to tank. Fight this trend by praising young women for what they do. Don’t say, “You’re so beautiful!” Instead say, “I love how curious you are about the solar system! You’re such an interesting person to talk to!”   DON’T TELL ME I’M SMART This sounds a little bit strange, but often little boys are praised for their hard work and girls are praised for their inherent intelligence. The problem with this is that when a little girl doesn’t do well she thinks it has to do with how smart she is rather than her work ethic. Her failures become a referendum on her intelligence.  Say, “Wow, you really worked hard” rather than, “Wow, you’re so smart!” You can always work harder, but you can’t change the brains you were born with!    DON’T BE TOO NICE TO ME When young women struggle in the sciences or STEM, often parents try to protect their feelings.  This can take the form of telling young women who are struggling that perhaps their major is just too hard --maybe they should do something that makes their life a little easier. Boys get the message not to give up - girls get the message to take the path of least resistance. Don’t coddle your girls. Hold them to the same tough standard you have with your boys.   DON’T SEE ME ONLY AS A GIRL OR A WOMAN Understand that if you are trying to support women you cannot do that in a White Woman vacuum. If a young woman you know is struggling, look at the other issues that might be intersecting. Does she have a disability? Is she a woman of color? Is she the first generation to go to college in her family? Audre Lorde famously said “there is no such thing as a single issue struggle because we do not live single issue lives.“ Make sure you are not treating every woman as if she is the same simply because of her gender. There could be all kinds of intersections that are also impacting her situation.   DO VALUE MY VOICE If you are an educator, pay attention to who you are listening to. Note how you value different voices. The patterns that impact girls and young women follow them throughout their education and into adulthood. Pay attention to who you’re calling on in class. Whose voice gets more weight? Watch for classroom dynamics that make certain people feel they have the right to speak and others feel they must remain silent. Be sure to encourage every student from kindergarten to PhD candidates to speak up and then make sure you’re listening. It’s wonderful how much weight we give to the voices of men and boys. Women should be afforded the same courtesy. Women’s success doesn’t just come from hiring women or making sure we are paid the same for doing the same work. It comes from making sure every woman, from the time she is a little girl, is given the message that she has worth, and that if she works hard enough, she can achieve her dreams. Let’s not tell our girls that they are pretty flowers who might crumble when life knocks them down. Let’s give them the message that life can be hard, but they can work harder, and if they do, success will be theirs. Eliza VanCort is an in-demand consultant, speaker, and writer on communications, career and workplace issues, and women’s empowerment. The founder of The Actor’s Workshop of Ithaca, she is also a Cook House Fellow at Cornell University, an advisory board member of the Performing Arts for Social Change, a Diversity Crew partner, and a member of Govern For America’s League of Innovators. Her first book, A Woman’s Guide to Claiming Space: Stand Tall. Raise Your Voice. Be Heard., publishes May 11, 2021.

Read More

Learning from the Pandemic: Steps to Take to Lessen the “Summer” Slide

Article | August 4, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic created unparalleled disruption in worldwide education systems. Schools shut their doors and moved lesson delivery online, forcing educators and students alike to adapt, often without the necessary processes and tools to do so. A recent article in The New York Times reported the sudden switch from classroom to remote learning cleared the slate on academic gains for U.S. students while widening the racial and economic gaps. Thus, catching up when the fall session begins – which is already an annual issue, will become even more of a challenge for many.

Read More

3 Ways Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Campus Cybersecurity

Article | April 1, 2020

It’s not just the wealth of sensitive data that places higher education institutions at greater risk. Higher ed also tends to be stretched thinner than other industries in terms of vulnerability management and other cybersecurity resources. Higher ed institutions typically lack the capacity to focus on everything they need to, especially given the threat level to student data, says Keith Rajecki, vice president of the public sector, education and research industry solutions group at Oracle.

Read More

Why is Education Industry opting for AI Chatbots? How Are They Benefiting It?

Article | March 5, 2020

Today many big names are using AI chatbots to improve their customer service and to engage more and more audience to stay relevant and visible. Apart from business, other sectors are also deploying chatbots including educational institutes and educators. Chatbot makers utilize artificial intelligence and the latest conversational design to create bots that can communicate with students on all subjects of elementary, secondary, high school and up to university levels. However, AI will not (but may in next 20 something years) replace a student’s favorite teacher but can serve as a helper to the teacher or alternatively, the means of modern education.

Read More

Spotlight

Vretta Inc.

The mission of Vretta is to contribute to the transformation of mathematics education by designing and developing digital products that push the boundaries of technology innovation, raising the level of numeracy for every learner. Vretta’s products include interactive formative resources that break-down concepts into micro-steps for students to visualize, conceptualize, and engage with mathematics. Secure and robust engines house interoperable assessments and questionnaires for large-scale and in-class implementation on multiple devices. Teachers have real-time data visualizations to support individual and class student success and the capacity to customize the learning and assessment experience. Administrators have powerful dashboards with actionable data to make well-informed policy decisions to reduce equity gaps and raise attainment in their jurisdictions. Vretta’s products have been credited with prestigious awards in recognition of the successful implementation of its formative,

Events