10 Tipsto Personalize Learning in Your Classroom

| January 16, 2019

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Personalized learning adapts instructional strategies to fit each individual student’s strengths, weaknesses, interests, and pace. It blends teacher instruction, technology-based instruction, and student collaboration to tap into each student’s learning style and interests for deeper learning.This generation of students personalizes their music, their friends, and almost everything in their lives but education. However, schools and teachers who can personalize learning create an incredible opportunity to engage and relate to the modern student.

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Magoosh

We took traditional test prep and flipped it on its head. Magoosh is out to prove that those months leading up to test day don't have to be miserable. In fact, with our help they can actually be enjoyable. Our team is full of expert teachers, tutors, engineers, and education aficionados creating the highest quality tools and resources you need to study at your own pace, on your own time. And the best part? You can afford it. We even offer many of our lessons, apps, and videos for free.

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What has a global crisis taught us about the future of higher education?

Article | June 29, 2020

The public response during COVID-19 has demonstrated both the perpetual value of education and a renewed appreciation of Australia’s research capability and expertise. At a time when everything has been stripped back to basics and our understanding of ‘essential services’ has been redefined, university education and research have endured.

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Beacon-Based Educational Solutions: Secure Students And Assets

Article | March 4, 2020

What seemed impossible once is all happening today, thanks to one little device that is doing wonders in each arena. Beacons and proximity marketing have revolutionized the way organizations work, be it any size, any segment. The very competency of beacons to communicate information to nearby mobile devices based on their location and proximity to other beacons is the key to their success. It helps decrease the virtual distance between physical objects. One such domain that has been enjoying the wonderful advantages that beacons offer is the education domain. As it is, it's an arena of happenings with lots of newer advancements coming up and, hence, the right place to leverage the potential of beacons.

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How Have Educators Adapted Distance Learning for Special Education Students?

Article | May 3, 2021

Special education instructors, like everyone else, turned to an array of digital tools and technologies to continue teaching in the wake of the pandemic. And while most would agree the shift to online learning came with serious challenges, many also found solutions that worked. “This last year was a struggle — I won’t tell you it was not,” says Wendy Thompson, a special education teacher at New Jersey’s A. Harry Moore School. “That being said, we have seen success, and there are things out there that can help.” Thompson, who is also president of the New Jersey Coalition for the Advancement of Assistive and Rehabilitation Technology, says the key is to ensure the tools educators use can be adapted to fit the needs of individual students. “It’s important to approach students where they are and provide them with options for how they can respond and show what they know and what they are learning.”

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Back to school after lockdown – tips from an NHS Psychologist

Article | October 1, 2020

Since some schools across the UK have started to re-open in phases, it’s opened up a whole new set of questions for families. What will it be like for our kids? How will my child adjust to school after months at home? As well as adjusting academically to full-time education again, the emotional impact will be big too. We spoke to NHS Senior Clinical Psychologist, Dr Shreena Ghelani, about how parents can help their get kids ready to return to school, whenever that might be. Here’s what she had to say: Prepare in advance Before it’s time for them to go back, keep school in the minds of your kids – drive past the school if you can so that they can see that it’s still there. When they’ve been given a return date, treat it like the beginning of the school year. Do a test run of getting ready in the morning, make sure school uniform fits, practice packing bags and walking the route to school. For younger children, they may need a settling in period again – parents may have to come into the classroom and ensure their child is settled. For teenagers – use the time while they’re still at home to keep their friendships alive by video call etc. This will help make returning back to their peer group feel less unfamiliar. One step at a time Even when school re starts, you may find that children are more tired than usual by the extra demands and sensory stimulation placed on them. Ease them back in to their routine gently and wait to start other activities (clubs and activities) in a few weeks time. Manage expectations When the time comes, you’ll find you’ll feel less stressed if you know there will be bumps in the road. Allow enough space and time in a new schedule for any hiccups so that you’re not having to manage too many demands (i.e batch cook dinners before hand, don’t agree to extra activities or if possible, adopt flexible working hours). Try to notice if you’re feeling anxious about the return to school in any way and if so, spend some time thinking about it and unpicking it. If children pick up on your anxieties they may feel anxious too. Managing worry and anxiety If you know your child might struggle with going back to school, try developing a toolbox of things they can do when they are worried at school. This might include a song to sing to them selves, visualising a calm place, some affirmation cards, practicing a breathing techniques and identifying safe staff they can tell. You can make this box together and the child can take some bits with them to school. Speak to your children about the impact of Coronavirus Let children know that it is likely that other families have been impacted by the virus (whether that’s key worker parents working hard, or family bereavements). Encourage your child to be patient with and kind to other children. Talk to them about what they might still be expected to do – not hug friends, wash their hands often, not share food or toys etc. For any children with special educational needs, they might need adaptations made for them. This might include visiting the school while it’s empty to familiarise them with the space, a video call with their teacher or a more phased return than other pupils – whatever’s best for them.

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Spotlight

Magoosh

We took traditional test prep and flipped it on its head. Magoosh is out to prove that those months leading up to test day don't have to be miserable. In fact, with our help they can actually be enjoyable. Our team is full of expert teachers, tutors, engineers, and education aficionados creating the highest quality tools and resources you need to study at your own pace, on your own time. And the best part? You can afford it. We even offer many of our lessons, apps, and videos for free.

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