This recruitment strategy could save the teaching profession

TES | January 28, 2019

Saving the teaching profession? It sounds dramatic, but it’s no exaggeration about how I feel about the stand-out feature of the Department for Education Teacher Recruitment and Retention Strategy, published today.The focus on support for early career teachers (extending the induction period, providing an evidence-informed framework that sets out an entitlement to support, giving time off timetable to do it, with time and support also for teacher educators – all funded) is the most potentially game-changing policy move I can remember – if we manage to get it right (emphasis on “we”).After several months sitting on the DfE advisory board and also on the Carter Review of initial teacher training (ITT) – and as director of an institute of education – I feel pretty steeped in the issue at present.And, for me, the Early Career Framework could be a truly powerful way of tackling it.

Spotlight

We asked students across our campuses: what does success in college mean to you? The answers stunned us: it wasn't just graduation, not just a job. Their responses were far more nuanced than any of our interventions and strategies could anticipate.

Spotlight

We asked students across our campuses: what does success in college mean to you? The answers stunned us: it wasn't just graduation, not just a job. Their responses were far more nuanced than any of our interventions and strategies could anticipate.

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