Survey: Just 9% of graduates find alumni networks helpful

Education Dive | January 15, 2019

Just 9% of graduates say their undergraduate alumni networks have been helpful or very helpful in their career so far, according to the Strada-Gallup Alumni Survey of more than 5,100 respondents. More than two-thirds (69%) said their networks were neither helpful nor unhelpful, while 22% said they had been unhelpful or very unhelpful.The survey found slight differences between graduates of higher- and lower-ranked schools. Of those who attended colleges within the top 50 of U.S. News & World Report's annual ranking, 16% said they found their alumni networks helpful, compared to 10% of those who attended institutions ranked from 51 to 100 and 8% from those ranked outside the top 100.Stephanie Marken, executive director of education research at Gallup and the paper's co-author, said the survey aimed to investigate elite institutions' claims that their alumni networks would land students a job after graduation. Yet the report found differences among students' satisfaction with their networks to be "relatively minor and unlikely to offset the significant differences in tuition costs."

Spotlight

The concept of retention is fundamental to training and development. With good reason. It means that the consumable object you create is actually sticking. With virtual reality, where you’re engaging the ears and the eyes, retention takes on new meaning.Miami’s Children Health System is using VR to train doctors, nurses and medical personnel on medical procedures like intubation, wound care, and the Heimlich maneuver. Results show that these VR training programs offer better retention compared to traditional training. According to CEO Dr. Narendra Kini, the program showed an 80% retention rate a year after training, compared to 20% a week after traditional training.

Spotlight

The concept of retention is fundamental to training and development. With good reason. It means that the consumable object you create is actually sticking. With virtual reality, where you’re engaging the ears and the eyes, retention takes on new meaning.Miami’s Children Health System is using VR to train doctors, nurses and medical personnel on medical procedures like intubation, wound care, and the Heimlich maneuver. Results show that these VR training programs offer better retention compared to traditional training. According to CEO Dr. Narendra Kini, the program showed an 80% retention rate a year after training, compared to 20% a week after traditional training.

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DeepHow and UL Solutions Collaborate to Bring Video-Based Training on ComplianceWire

DeepHow | January 04, 2023

UL Solutions recently announced selecting DeepHow's AI-powered video-based training platform to enhance and add a robust capability to the renowned compliance training learning management system (LMS), ComplianceWire, for life sciences companies. All organizations in the life sciences need to provide their employees and contractors with mechanisms for continual skill development and competency management. UL Solutions' ComplianceWire is a platform that manages, tracks, and delivers qualifications and task-based technical capabilities in an environment driven by compliance. UL Solutions provides a comprehensive library of over 400 life sciences-specific courses, 110 of which were developed in collaboration with the FDA. With the integration of DeepHow's video-based skills collection and delivery capabilities into ComplianceWire, UL Solutions' life sciences customers can now optimize their training delivery with captivating videos. DeepHow empowers training content managers to collect instructional content using a smartphone and turn it into engaging and impactful videos that enhance training delivery. DeepHow integrates the most recent developments in artificial intelligence, computer vision, natural language processing, and knowledge mapping to transform the way in which knowledge is digitized, captured, and structured. The company has developed and distributes an AI-powered workforce readiness platform for workplaces where capabilities are required to conduct standard operational procedures. The company makes it easier to gather and share technical skills and knowledge, which cuts project time by a factor of ten, improves employee performance by 25%, and cuts overall training and development costs by a large amount. About UL Solutions UL Solutions, a world leader in applied safety science, converts sustainability, safety, and security concerns into opportunities for customers in over 100 countries. UL Solutions provides inspection, testing, and certification services, in addition to software solutions and consultancy services, to support business growth and product development. The UL Certification Marks represent an unrelenting commitment to improving the safety mission and serve as a recognized symbol of confidence in the customers' products. The company assists customers in innovating, introducing new products and services, navigating global marketplaces and intricate supply chains, and growing sustainably and ethically for the future. About DeepHow DeepHow was founded in 2018 by a group of researchers and engineers who used to work at Siemens. They saw an unmet need in the skilled trades market to transfer knowledge. They created a platform for capturing and learning from video-based knowledge that is powered by AI and fills the skills gap in the manufacturing, construction, and service industries. DeepHow makes it easier to capture knowledge by using AI workflow indexing and segmentation.

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EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

Learning A-Z Announce the Launch of Complete K-5 Writing Solution

Learning A-Z | January 12, 2023

Learning A-Z, a subsidiary of the Cambium Learning Group, has announced the addition of its totally redesigned Writing A-Z® product to its superior range of learning solutions. Writing A-Z is a new and improved curriculum option for K–5 students that draw on the Learning A-Z principles of valuing the teacher at the center of the classroom. In addition, the platform provides teachers with customizable, user-friendly tools that foster excellent student results. In addition, Learning A-Z has, for the first time, made a Teacher Grant Program available to K–5 educators interested in discovering new and innovative ways to improve student writing achievement. The winners of the grants will receive a one-year subscription to Writing A-Z. The application deadline for awards is January 31, 2023, and grants will be distributed on February 10, 2023. Lisa O'Masta, President of Learning A-Z, said, "Writing is an essential part of K–5 education and deeply connected to the instruction of literacy." She further added, "The most recent NAEP writing scores show that nearly ¾ of students in grades 8-12 are not writing at a proficient level. Because students write daily and the practice is a foundation of their educational experience, we've recognized the need for new writing tools that are even more innovative and easy to use and are committed to delivering these tools into the hands of teachers." Using Writing A-Z, teachers assist students in the development of their writing abilities through research-based education. Writing A-Z combines best practices for teachers with guided practice for students to facilitate writing achievement in the classroom. Lesson plans that are simple to apply, digital writing and grammar practice, and continuous professional learning are some of the elements that make Writing A-Z a comprehensive and user-friendly writing solution for K–5 education. About Learning A-Z Learning A-Z is an emerging provider of literacy-focused PreK–6 education technology solutions. The company's products combine traditional teacher-led instruction with technology-enabled resources to make teaching more efficient and effective, practice more personalized and accessible, assessment more automated and strategic, and learning more proactive and informed. Its award-winning digital products, such as Raz-Kids and Reading A-Z, are used by more than 12 million students in over 170 countries.

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EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

LISC teams up with HBCUs on talent development program for students, expanded capacity for CDFIs

Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) | November 25, 2022

The Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) has launched a new internship program for students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to help bridge the opportunity gap for students of color—offering community development mentorship and experience that gives young people a leg up when entering the workforce. Over the next two years, LISC's National HBCU Talent Development program is placing 40 students in part-time intern positions with local LISC offices and other community development financial institutions (CDFIs). Interns will support a range of initiatives, from marketing to finance to community engagement, while also participating in leadership and national networking events. The program is funded by the Citi Foundation and is specifically designed to address national disparities in internships, with White students significantly more likely to gain paid versus unpaid positions than Black students. The LISC internship pays $25/hour up to $15,000 for the academic year. Talent is everywhere, but opportunity is not," noted Denise Scott, LISC president, who held a virtual "fireside" chat with the initial cohort of interns last month. This program is part of our work to address systemic racial barriers that keep young people from gaining the experience and connections they need to compete for good jobs," she explained. "Through this program, students can earn a strong wage, gain hands-on experience, work with mentors and build a network of contacts and supporters all while supporting valuable community investment activity," she continued. "It's a win for all of us. At the outset, eight HBCUs are participating in the program, with young people from varied backgrounds and experiences applying to participate. Eryn Glover, for instance, is a sophomore marketing major at Johnson C. Smith University (JCSU) in Charlotte, N.C., and one of LISC's first HBCU interns. She is working with the staff at LISC Charlotte to support fundraising, social media and community outreach, helping extend LISC's engagement with the region's philanthropic leaders and supporting valuable collaborations with local partners. I've always known that I wanted to do nonprofit work and put my skills to work to help people," said Glover, a South Jersey native who has spent recent summer breaks working at community-based organizations. She chose JCSU for her education because she wanted to attend an HBCU, benefit from a smaller university, and be close to family that had moved to North Carolina. I feel like I have opportunities here, like the LISC internship, that offer the chance to really get to know professors and mentors, and to also make a difference. I want to work in marketing within the nonprofit space, so this internship really aligns with that," she said. In Washington, D.C., Howard University senior Marsi Hailu is interning with the LISC policy team. Her early projects include mapping gaps in broadband access especially in rural communities and researching the disproportionate impact of climate events on low-income communities of color.I already knew that there is a lack of intergenerational wealth in Black and Brown communities because of historical discrimination," she said of her initial research. "But I guess I didn't realize how much that intersects with geography. It's a lot easier to recover from a disaster if you aren't already living paycheck to paycheck," she added. Hailu, a finance major from Northern Virginia, hopes to pursue a graduate degree in urban development after graduation, with a concentration in affordable housing. She said the LISC internship offers the opportunity to try her hand at different aspects of community development, going well beyond what she might learn in her finance classes. In a lot of places, housing is at the root of inequality," she said, explaining her passion for the work. "As someone who grew up in the area, I see the disparities facing low-income folks. I want to do something about that," she said. In addition to Howard and JCSU, initial HBCU supporters of the program include Edward Waters University (Florida), LeMoyne-Owen College (Tennessee), Lincoln University (Pennsylvania), Morehouse College (Georgia), Simmons College (Kentucky), and Virginia State University (Virginia). Additional HBCUs will be referring students in the months to come. LISC's Scott said the universities are eager to help students identify new opportunities for advancement—particularly given that many of the schools already have existing relationships with LISC, collaborating on local efforts related housing and economic development. "Here at Johnson C. Smith University, we strive to graduate global citizens who develop a compelling sense of social and civic responsibility for leadership and service,. "LISC's internship program is an excellent way for JCSU students to put this possibility into perspective outside of the classroom. Just as we strive to develop a better world by graduating the best and brightest, LISC does the same by investing in its community to make economic equality a reality," he said. JCSU President Clarence D. Armbrister The National HBCU Talent Development program draws on the experience of LISC's nearly three decades of work with AmeriCorps, including the Economic Mobility Corps (EMC) launched in 2020. Through EMC, LISC places national service members in positions that help build the capacity of CDFIs. We have long seen the value in connecting people to community development positions in places that they know and care about," Scott said. "Our HBCU internship program takes that a step further, focusing on gaps in opportunity for students of color, injecting equity into CDFI recruitment efforts and building a community development workforce that reflects the people and places it serves. About LISC LISC is one of the country's largest community development organizations, helping forge vibrant, resilient communities across America. We work with residents and partners to close systemic gaps in health, wealth and opportunity and advance racial equity so that people and places can thrive. Since our founding in 1979, LISC has invested $26.7 billion to create more than 463,000 affordable homes and apartments, develop 78.5 million square feet of retail, community and educational space and help tens of thousands of people find employment and improve their finances.

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