Space: a perfect way to inspire Stem study

tes | July 15, 2019

Space: a perfect way to inspire Stem study
If you asked any class of students, of any age, “What job would you do if you worked for Nasa?” the top answer would probably be astronaut. But of the 17,000 people employed at Nasa, only 38 are astronauts – 0.2 per cent of the workforce. So, if 99.8 per cent of the people working for Nasa aren’t astronauts, what do they do? The space industry actually has a really diverse workforce. In my case, I’m a seismologist. I study earthquakes and now marsquakes, too. Nasa also employs specialists in disciplines as varied as geology, meteorology, engineering, IT and data science to name but a few. All this means that for teachers trying to engage primary pupils in the idea of a career in science, technology, engineering and maths (Stem), space exploration is a great place to start. Take Nasa’s InSight Mission, for example. InSight is a robotic lander that set down on Mars in November 2018 with the aim of studying the physics of the Red Planet so that we can understand how it formed and why it’s now so different from Earth. This fun quiz could be a good way to help students start to learn about Mars and why the InSight Mission is so interesting.

Spotlight

An innovator in the online learning space for nearly 20 years, Drexel University’s College of Nursing and Health Professions continues to utilize emerging technologies, such as Kubi, a telepresence robot.

Spotlight

An innovator in the online learning space for nearly 20 years, Drexel University’s College of Nursing and Health Professions continues to utilize emerging technologies, such as Kubi, a telepresence robot.

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