Research-informed practices can aid educators in improving school schedules

St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in Potomac, Maryland., has switched up its school day to lighten homework loads, reduce unproductive transitions and improve student focus, among other goals, EdSurge reports. The changes were made based on neuroscience and student learning research from the school's Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning.After 18 months of planning, the school — which starts at 8:30 a.m. — rolled out a new schedule with longer classes that meet three times a week, rather than four shorter periods. The school hopes longer periods will promote creative teaching and deeper learning, spur less overwhelming homework loads, and allow for more focus and a more moderate school life tempo, EdSurge notes.The new schedule should also open up more time for students and teachers to meet one-on-one during the day, minimize conflicts between class time and other school activities, allow for research-informed professional development and allow for students to pursue their own interests. And roughly six months into the new format, the school says it looks to be successful. The classroom norm has changed drastically since the introduction of what's known as more traditional learning formats: early school starts, many classes each day and the same set of electives. Today, high school students are expected to complete more credits, have a chosen career path, and maybe even have some professional certifications under their belt by the time they graduate.

Spotlight

Spotlight

Related News