Online curricula helps teachers tackle AI in the classroom

Education Dive | January 23, 2019

Online curricula helps teachers tackle AI in the classroom
Schools may already use some form of artificial intelligence (AI), but hardly any have curricula designed to teach K-12 students how it works and how to use it, wrote EdSurge. However, organizations such as the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) are developing their own sets of lessons that teachers can take to their classrooms.Members of "AI for K-12" — an initiative co-sponsored by the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence and the Computer Science Teachers Association — wrote in a paper that an AI curriculum should address five basic ideas:While computers are smart, it's hard for them to understand people's emotions, intentions and natural languages, making interactions less comfortable.

Spotlight

Your school is probably under pressure to increase retention, graduation, and post-graduation employment rates—the measures that determine public funding, consumer interest, and support.In this ebook, we’ll cover how marketing automation can help higher ed organizations:
- Improve the results of your marketing outreach by engaging prospective, current, and former students
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Spotlight

Your school is probably under pressure to increase retention, graduation, and post-graduation employment rates—the measures that determine public funding, consumer interest, and support.In this ebook, we’ll cover how marketing automation can help higher ed organizations:
- Improve the results of your marketing outreach by engaging prospective, current, and former students
- Create a strategy as sophisticated as the best-in-class marketers from every other industry.

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