Here’s how AI can aid in identifying students who need help

Study International | February 10, 2020

Here’s how AI can aid in identifying students who need help
Researchers from North Carolina State University have designed an artificial intelligence (AI) model that can predict how much students are learning in educational games. Their paper, Predictive Student Modeling in Educational Games with Multi-Task Learning, was co-authored by James Lester, Distinguished University Professor of Computer Science and director of CEI, NC State’ and Roger Azevedo, Professor in the Department of Learning Sciences and Educational Research, University of Central Florida. The paper’s authors note that in recent years, there has been growing interest in modeling student knowledge in adaptive learning environments. Predictive student modeling is “the task of predicting students’ future performance on a problem or test based upon their past interactions with a learning environment”.

Spotlight

Select results from the 2018 national survey that tracks the development of online and digital learning in Canadian public post-secondary education. Despite online education being quite mainstream, there is actually very little data published about it. This paucity of data allowed MOOCsters to push their false narrative about the death of universities.

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The shift to online learning shows both promising trends and troubling signs

ICT | May 25, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered an abrupt transition to distance education, training and e-learning. The crisis has resulted in massive shifts to online platforms and tools for the continued delivery of learning and skills development, which have shown both promising trends. In the future, skills that can easily be acquired and strengthened via distance learning during this pandemic could change the landscape of work for the coming generation. The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered an abrupt transition to distance education, training and e-learning. The crisis has resulted in massive shifts to online platforms and tools for the continued delivery of learning and skills development, which have shown both promising trends and troubling signs. Among those signs, the evidence that, while much is being made of digital learning making access more equitable, access to online platforms doesn’t always result in equal quality learning. Women, for example, are being disproportionately cut off from distance learning due to lack of childcare or home help during the pandemic. These were among some of the main conclusions emerging from a recent E-Discussion on “Continuing online learning and skills development in times of the COVID-19 crisis”, organized by the ILO’s Skills and Employability Branch through its Global Skills for Employment Knowledge Sharing Platform. For more than two weeks, the virtual discussion drew scores of practitioners, representatives of training institutions and policy-makers from around the world who shared their experiences regarding the impact of the pandemic, highlighted challenges that have emerged for education and training and offered solutions for tackling them. Learn more: COVID-19 SUMMER TO KEEP THE OPPORTUNITY DOORS OPEN FOR EDUCATION COMPANIES . “Representatives of training institutions and policy-makers from around the world who shared their experiences regarding the impact of the pandemic, highlighted challenges that have emerged for education and training and offered solutions for tackling them.” ~ Policy-Makers say Challenges included: instructors not properly trained and prepared to deliver online courses. Difficulties in adapting TVET (Technical and Vocational Education and Training) curricula and training to online formats. Lack of access to the internet or ICT (Information and communications technology) equipment to carry out learning or training. Apprentices ready for assessment but who couldn’t be assessed due to COVID-19 issues. Students unable to access the resources necessary to continue their training because they were not familiar with online platforms. Yet, despite these challenges, students, apprentices, providers of TVET, and policy-makers are making the important changes needed when it comes to learning and acquiring skills in times of crisis. “Continuing online learning and skills development in times of the COVID-19 crisis”, organized by the ILO’s Skills and Employability Branch through its Global Skills for Employment Knowledge Sharing Platform. ” For example, in Uruguay, INEFOP (Instituto Nacional de Empleo y Formación Profesional) developed a contingency plan calling for proposals from institutions that wanted to work in distance and semi-presence courses. Based on this, a table was created to study the methodology of moving from face-to-face courses to online formats. In Bangladesh, the Skill 21 project, a joint initiative of the government and the ILO, is developing an e-campus which would be the first online learning management platform for the TVET sector in the country. In England, the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) is taking steps to ensure that, wherever possible, apprentices can continue and complete their apprenticeship, despite any break they need to take as a result of COVID-19. New forms of partnerships are also emerging. In Syria, for example, a partnership established with IECD, a development assistance organization, is being repackaged to include e-learning, and to develop videos on recent training programmes in construction, agriculture and manufacturing. In the future, skills that can easily be acquired and strengthened via distance learning during this pandemic could change the landscape of work for the coming generation. In the near-term, we need to think about the “new” skills required by industry and employers post-COVID-19 to get people back into employment quickly. These might encompass short courses and/or skill sets that are targeted. In the long-term, hiring remote workers could become more commonplace. One thing seems clear: Giving informal education a more privileged spot in the lifelong learning concept to ensure better validation of skills will be critically important when we emerge from this crisis. With the COVID-19 pandemic, the ongoing mega-experiment in distant learning demonstrates that no country has been properly prepared for such a challenge. Schools and universities in both developing and developed countries struggle with the complexity of providing equitable access to education. To address the educational crisis, the most inspiring actions have been taken by individual teachers in both rich and poor countries. Learn more: HOW THE REMOTE LEARNING PIVOT COULD SHAPE HIGHER ED IT .

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Quality Matters, the Virtual Learning Leadership Alliance, and 2gnoMe Introduce a New Portal to Support Teaching Mastery of Effective Online Practices

prnewswire | October 22, 2020

COVID-19 has upended how teachers teach and how their students learn. The pandemic highlights gaps in skill readiness and inequities in access to quality resources. The work of the National Standards for Quality (NSQ) Online Learning is more relevant than ever for K-12 educators, especially those that may be new to teaching students in a blended setting or completely online. We must provide teachers the support they need to be effective online teachers if we are to close the learning gap and keep students on track to succeed.

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EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

K2 Integrity and DIFC Academy Partner to Offer the DOLFIN eLearning Platform in the UAE

K2 Integrity | October 01, 2021

K2 Integrity and the DIFC Academy announced a partnership agreement to promote and market subscriptions to K2 Integrity's eLearning platform, DOLFIN, the premier online working environment for the financial integrity community. Designed specifically for professionals working in counter-illicit finance and financial crimes compliance, the DOLFIN platform delivers a full suite of customizable online training, testing, and certification resources and risk management tools to mitigate financial crime and sanctions risks and help institutions meet regulatory requirements. For over a decade, Dubai International Financial Centre (DIFC), the leading global financial center in the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia (MEASA) region, has delivered professional development and higher education courses to the financial services industry. The DOLFIN platform offers comprehensive resources on anti-money laundering (AML), sanctions, export controls, terrorism and proliferation financing, anti-bribery and corruption (ABC), and fraud. It also tracks illicit financing trends and regulatory developments in key jurisdictions around the world and provides users with daily content across the spectrum of financial crime topics. The partnership will further compliance training opportunities for professionals operating in the DIFC and support the Centre's vision to drive the future of finance. "Today's financial crimes compliance issues are evolving at a breathless pace, and it is more important than ever to develop the most innovative solutions—training and continued learning cannot be left behind. DOLFIN is designed and delivered by world-class financial crimes risk and compliance experts, including framers of the modern global counter-illicit financing regime," said Danny McGlynn, Senior Managing Director, K2 Integrity, and leader of the DOLFIN team. "This partnership allows us to introduce DOLFIN's unparalleled range of reference materials, tools, and analysis to the financial services industry across the MEASA region, and to provide access to reputable financial crimes compliance courses for UAE nationals, residents, and business partners. The K2 Integrity team looks forward to participating in programs throughout the UAE and the region, while introducing DOLFIN to over 3,200 companies registered in the DIFC ecosystem," McGlynn concluded. As the leading financial hub of the region, we also focus on strengthening the professional development of financial sector professionals to ensure they uphold the highest standards of integrity and governance in all their operations. In a constantly evolving industry, it is imperative that the financial professionals are up-to-speed with the new trends and challenges, especially in terms of compliance and risk issues. The partnership with K2Integrity further adds value to the DIFC Academy to bring world-class standards of AML and Compliance expertise and support the UAE's goal to build a knowledge-based economy Alya Al Zarouni, Executive Vice President of Operations and Head of DIFC Academy, DIFC Authority. About K2 Integrity K2 Integrity helps clients understand and manage risk so they can lead with confidence in a complex world—and build organizations that are safer, more transparent, and more resilient. By encouraging and enabling organizations to act with integrity, we can increase trust in institutions and promote prosperity and growth throughout the world. K2 Integrity has realized this promise in its role as the preeminent risk, compliance, investigations, and monitoring firm—built by industry leaders, driven by interdisciplinary teams, and supported by cutting-edge technology to safeguard clients' operations, reputations, and economic security. K2 Integrity represents the merger of K2 Intelligence, founded by Jeremy M. Kroll and Jules B. Kroll, the originator of the modern corporate investigations industry, and Financial Integrity Network (FIN), founded by Juan Zarate and Chip Poncy, former senior Treasury and U.S. government officials responsible for helping shape the modern AML/CFT regime. About Dubai International Financial Centre Dubai International Financial Centre (DIFC) is one of the world's most advanced financial centres, and the leading financial hub for the Middle East, Africa and South Asia (MEASA), which comprises 72 countries with an approximate population of 3 billion and a nominal GDP of USD 7.7 trillion. With a 16-year track record of facilitating trade and investment flows across the MEASA region, the Centre connects these fast-growing markets with the economies of Asia, Europe and the Americas through Dubai. DIFC is home to an internationally recognised, independent regulator and a proven judicial system with an English common law framework, as well as the region's largest financial ecosystem of almost 27,000 professionals working across over 2,900 active registered companies – making up the largest and most diverse pool of industry talent in the region. The Centre's vision is to drive the future of finance. Today, it offers one of the region's most comprehensive FinTech and venture capital environments, including cost-effective licensing solutions, fit-for-purpose regulation, innovative accelerator programmes, and funding for growth-stage start-ups.

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Spotlight

Select results from the 2018 national survey that tracks the development of online and digital learning in Canadian public post-secondary education. Despite online education being quite mainstream, there is actually very little data published about it. This paucity of data allowed MOOCsters to push their false narrative about the death of universities.