Early intervention helps students stay on track for graduation

educationdive | April 23, 2019

Early intervention helps students stay on track for graduation
Raising graduation rates often means tracking and providing extra support to those students who are at risk of dropping out, District Administration reports. Districts with lower dropout rates sometimes have designated staff members that reach out to students right away if they stop showing up for class.Intervention should occur as soon as possible, the article says. Often the absences are related to financial problems that can be fixed through social services. Also, adding an additional fifth year can ensure eventual graduation.Tracking students’ grades and attendance as early as 9th grade allows districts to get a jump start on those students who are at risk of dropping out. Many believe that students start showing signs of dropping out after the transition from middle school. Students at risk of dropping out have trouble planning for the future, struggle academically, have low attendance records and often have special needs. Language and literacy skills are factors, as well as the socioeconomic status of their family.

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We believe in four essential teaching skills that we call the 'Big Four' — they're at the heart of Bridge's teaching philosophy.At first, Teacher Wuraloa thought that the new teacher training was from another world.

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Spotlight

We believe in four essential teaching skills that we call the 'Big Four' — they're at the heart of Bridge's teaching philosophy.At first, Teacher Wuraloa thought that the new teacher training was from another world.