As Instructure Revenue Grows, Questions Emerge Over Bridge Corporate Learning System

edsurge | October 31, 2019

As Instructure Revenue Grows, Questions Emerge Over Bridge Corporate Learning System
Instructure’s third quarter performance left some investors beaming, but the company’s long term strategy appears more muddy. For one, the CEO of the learning management system provider didn’t shirk away from a possible sale of its corporate LMS, Bridge, which launched in 2015. “Nothing is off the table,” Dan Goldsmith told investors in response to a question about a sale or spinoff of Bridge, according to a transcript of the company’s earnings call Monday. He continued: “But the focus for us is really making Bridge successful, making Bridge financially beneficial and accretive and healthy and then continuing to grow over time.” Goldsmith promised more details at an investors event Dec. 3 at the company’s Salt Lake City headquarters. But until then, here are some highlights from the earnings call and how analysts have reacted. Perhaps best known for its Canvas LMS for K-12 and higher education, Instructure bested Wall Street expectations for the quarter that ended Sept. 30. The company reported $68.3 million in revenue for the quarter, a 23 percent increase year over year. Most of that revenue came from subscriptions and support services. Instructure has more than 4,000 customers, which includes learning institutions and companies.

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All survey results are copyrighted by the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources (CUPA-HR). No data contained in a survey report or obtained through DataOnDemand (DOD) may be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the written consent of CUPA-HR. Report findings and conclusions may be appropriately cited/referenced in other reporting if there is proper acknowledgment of the source and the referenced material does not involve reproduction of data tables or graphics.

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