Ace your enrollments with the ideal higher education marketing strategy

educationdive | June 11, 2019

School is full of competition. Students are competing to get accepted, competing for scholarships and competing for honor roll and the Dean’s list once they’re in. Higher education institutions are not exempt from the competition—they’re in a constant battle to capture the attention of prospective students and win the race for enrollment. As a result, higher education marketers need to find innovative and cost-effective ways to bring quality, prospective students to their programs amidst this increasingly competitive market. College admissions directors have reported a great deal of concern about meeting their enrollment goals. In fact, with the exception of public doctoral institutions, over 50% of respondents from every institution, polled by Inside Higher Ed, have high anxiety about filling classes. The audience they need to reach is progressively savvy, always on the move and constantly refocusing their attention on new platforms to meet their social needs and desires. Higher education institutions need to keep up!

Spotlight

Play it Safe is an online solution that is easy to plan and available 24/7. No need to organize classical training sessions with the hassle of getting all people together at the same time at the same place. Your employees can train when they have time, regardless of location; whether on the train or at the office.

Spotlight

Play it Safe is an online solution that is easy to plan and available 24/7. No need to organize classical training sessions with the hassle of getting all people together at the same time at the same place. Your employees can train when they have time, regardless of location; whether on the train or at the office.

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Catherine Hershey Schools for Early Learning to Expand into Lancaster County

Milton Hershey School | November 14, 2022

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EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

LISC teams up with HBCUs on talent development program for students, expanded capacity for CDFIs

Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) | November 25, 2022

The Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) has launched a new internship program for students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to help bridge the opportunity gap for students of color—offering community development mentorship and experience that gives young people a leg up when entering the workforce. Over the next two years, LISC's National HBCU Talent Development program is placing 40 students in part-time intern positions with local LISC offices and other community development financial institutions (CDFIs). Interns will support a range of initiatives, from marketing to finance to community engagement, while also participating in leadership and national networking events. The program is funded by the Citi Foundation and is specifically designed to address national disparities in internships, with White students significantly more likely to gain paid versus unpaid positions than Black students. 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She is working with the staff at LISC Charlotte to support fundraising, social media and community outreach, helping extend LISC's engagement with the region's philanthropic leaders and supporting valuable collaborations with local partners. I've always known that I wanted to do nonprofit work and put my skills to work to help people," said Glover, a South Jersey native who has spent recent summer breaks working at community-based organizations. She chose JCSU for her education because she wanted to attend an HBCU, benefit from a smaller university, and be close to family that had moved to North Carolina. I feel like I have opportunities here, like the LISC internship, that offer the chance to really get to know professors and mentors, and to also make a difference. I want to work in marketing within the nonprofit space, so this internship really aligns with that," she said. In Washington, D.C., Howard University senior Marsi Hailu is interning with the LISC policy team. 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EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

Learning A-Z Announce the Launch of Complete K-5 Writing Solution

Learning A-Z | January 12, 2023

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