Access to reliable internet, devices outside of class ongoing challenge

Educationdive | February 13, 2019

Access to reliable internet, devices outside of class ongoing challenge
The 2019 State of Digital Learning report from Schoology shows digital device access remains “the biggest obstacle to student learning,” presenting an issue for rural and urban schools alike, eSchool News reports More than half of the survey's 9,200 respondents said their school or district has a 1:1 device program, but only half of those allow their students to take those devices home.K-12 teachers reported that home access, finding time for individualized instruction, juggling digital tools and online safety were among their top challenges, while improving assessments, reporting and data-driven decision-making are top priorities. Digital devices and content can expand student learning in multiple ways, breaking down the barriers to accessing information and creating limitless, lifelong learning opportunities. However, educators can find that maintaining devices and students' access to learning sites add another challenge to their day, even if they have tech support at their school or in their district. As anyone who has had to troubleshoot an ailing piece of tech or wonder why they can’t gain access to a web site can attest, this is a level of frustration that no educator needs (or has time) to shoulder.

Spotlight

David Blake, Co-Founder and Executive Chairman of Degreed explores the value of education and what will change education forever.

Spotlight

David Blake, Co-Founder and Executive Chairman of Degreed explores the value of education and what will change education forever.

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