EDUCAUSE 2019: Tips for a Cloud Implementation in Higher Education

| October 21, 2019

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Whatever your reason to explore a jump from on-premises to a cloud environment, peer advice is always helpful in making the transition a successful one. Higher education IT leaders talked about their experience during an Oracle-sponsored cloud panel at the EDUCAUSE Annual Conference in Chicago. Each spoke to their reasons for moving to the cloud. For Borre Ulrichsen, CIO at Gonzaga University, the university’s administrative software platform required a major upgrade. “We really had to upgrade more resources and were not looking at making major investments in our on-prem data center,” Ulrichsen said. “The result was a shift from on-prem to an on-demand license strategy.”

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The Canadian Bureau for International Education

The Canadian Bureau for International Education (CBIE) is a national, bilingual, not-for-profit, membership organization dedicated to the promotion of Canada's international relations through international education: the free movement of ideas and learners across national boundaries.

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Reflecting on spring: 5 lessons learned to maximize K–3 fall instruction

Article | August 25, 2020

How fitting that our last day of in-person learning was Friday the 13th. I’m the vice principal at St. Barnabas Elementary School in the Bronx. That day in March I was refilling hand sanitizer when our week-long closure was announced. Like many of us, we scrambled, tossing teacher’s editions into bags and packing as many manipulatives as we could carry, all while lugging chart paper over our shoulders just in case. We didn’t know what was needed, so it all seemed logical to take.

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What’s it Like to Attend Arizona’s Best Online High School?

Article | August 25, 2020

Arizona is home to many things: the Grand Canyon, the Arizona Cardinals, and Arizona’s best online high school—ASU Prep Digital. Founded in 2017, ASU Prep Digital has quickly become Arizona’s best online high school, succeeding in bridging the gap between high school and college, equipping part-time and full-time students with the tools they need to earn their diploma, and helping them get on an accelerated path to university admission.

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Back to school after lockdown – tips from an NHS Psychologist

Article | August 25, 2020

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What is the Future for AI in EdTech

Article | August 25, 2020

Education Technology, or EdTech as it is colloquially known as is a term that refers to the practice of deploying technology to impart education. As it is highly adaptive and progressive; the education industry has always adopted new technologies, quite readily. Many types of education are already commonly used for educational purposes. These include search engines, live webinars, video streaming, and even specialized training applications.

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Spotlight

The Canadian Bureau for International Education

The Canadian Bureau for International Education (CBIE) is a national, bilingual, not-for-profit, membership organization dedicated to the promotion of Canada's international relations through international education: the free movement of ideas and learners across national boundaries.

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