BLENDING TEACHING AND TECHNOLOGY: SIMPLE STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVED STUDENT LEARNING

| February 28, 2018

article image
There is no such thing as a “typical” day for students in Lindsay Unified School District (LUSD), located about fifty miles southeast of Fresno in California’s Central Valley. In this highly mobile rural district, where 86 percent of students qualify for free or reduced-price meals and half are learning to speak English, every day offers each of the district’s 4,191 students a unique learning experience customized to that student’s specific needs.

Spotlight

UNESP

UNESP, acronym for Universidade Estadual Paulista (São Paulo State University), is a public university system in the State of São Paulo. It is part of the state’s public higher education system, which also includes University of Campinas (Unicamp), University of São Paulo (USP) and São Paulo State Technological College (Fatec). São Paulo State University has a combined student body of almost 40,000 students spread by its 23 campuses. The first of them is the Araraquara Pharmacy and Odontology Faculty, founded in 1923 and incorporated by the State of São Paulo in 1956. Before the university’s official foundation in 1976, its original twelve campuses were public independent faculties. UNESP is the most successful multi-campus university system within Brazil. It is also the country’s second largest one, comprising 33 faculties or institutes, 30 libraries, 2 hospitals, 3 animal hospitals, 5 farms and 7 complementary units.

OTHER ARTICLES

A Vision of AI for Joyful Education

Article | March 25, 2020

Many look to AI-powered tools to address the need to scale high-quality education and with good reason. A surge in educational content from online courses, expanded access to digital devices, and the contemporary renaissance in AI seem to provide the pieces necessary to deliver personalized learning at scale. However, technology has a poor track record for solving social issues without creating unintended harm. What negative effects can we predict, and how can we refine the objectives of AI researchers to account for such unintended consequences?

Read More

InstaVR launches affordable remote teaching pricing during outbreak

Article | March 16, 2020

InstaVR Inc., a provider of web-based virtual reality authoring and publishing, today launched organization wide academic pricing to give universities a more cost-effective way of using VR to provide remote learning and online classes during the coronavirus outbreak. The nationwide COVID-19 pandemic has led to numerous statewide and citywide closures of schools and universities, leading to the mandate of online classes for the remainder of the semester for many. The use of VR in remote teaching enables a far more immersive method to provide information than its 2D counterpart, so it’s a way to allow students to experience the classroom more closely without being there.

Read More

How Analog Security Cameras Paved the Way for Modern Campus Security

Article | March 2, 2020

There’s no denying that video surveillance is a big part of physical safety on campuses. Today, this technology is a security program staple for universities across the country. A 2019 survey by Campus Safety magazine found that 96 percent of respondents in the higher education, K–12 and healthcare sectors have security cameras installed on their campuses. Most universities have adopted network security cameras, which convert video signals into IP packets broadcast over a LAN or the internet, because they boost security. Schools are also utilizing tools, such as AI-based video analytics software, that enable public safety staff to monitor activity on campus without needing to be at their posts at all times.

Read More

5 Ways to Help Women Achieve Educational Success

Article | March 7, 2021

While the pandemic continues to wreak havoc on our economy, women continue to be disproportionately impacted. Now is the time to look at the long game. What changes can society make in order to insure that when the next big crisis happens, women don’t bear the brunt of it. Education, of course, has always been on the front line of changing societal disparities. However, much of the time we don’t look at the root causes of why young women underperform in certain areas. Below are five ways we can position women for educational success, from girlhood to the moment they walk into their first job. If you are a teacher, give this list to the parents you work with. Help them set the tone now so our girls grow up ready to take on the world. DON’T TELL ME I��M PRETTY Little girls, from the time they are young, are praised for how beautiful they are.  We talk to girls about how they look and boys about what they do. This escalates when little girls hit puberty. This is when girls start deriving their social capital from their looks and their grades start to tank. Fight this trend by praising young women for what they do. Don’t say, “You’re so beautiful!” Instead say, “I love how curious you are about the solar system! You’re such an interesting person to talk to!”   DON’T TELL ME I’M SMART This sounds a little bit strange, but often little boys are praised for their hard work and girls are praised for their inherent intelligence. The problem with this is that when a little girl doesn’t do well she thinks it has to do with how smart she is rather than her work ethic. Her failures become a referendum on her intelligence.  Say, “Wow, you really worked hard” rather than, “Wow, you’re so smart!” You can always work harder, but you can’t change the brains you were born with!    DON’T BE TOO NICE TO ME When young women struggle in the sciences or STEM, often parents try to protect their feelings.  This can take the form of telling young women who are struggling that perhaps their major is just too hard --maybe they should do something that makes their life a little easier. Boys get the message not to give up - girls get the message to take the path of least resistance. Don’t coddle your girls. Hold them to the same tough standard you have with your boys.   DON’T SEE ME ONLY AS A GIRL OR A WOMAN Understand that if you are trying to support women you cannot do that in a White Woman vacuum. If a young woman you know is struggling, look at the other issues that might be intersecting. Does she have a disability? Is she a woman of color? Is she the first generation to go to college in her family? Audre Lorde famously said “there is no such thing as a single issue struggle because we do not live single issue lives.“ Make sure you are not treating every woman as if she is the same simply because of her gender. There could be all kinds of intersections that are also impacting her situation.   DO VALUE MY VOICE If you are an educator, pay attention to who you are listening to. Note how you value different voices. The patterns that impact girls and young women follow them throughout their education and into adulthood. Pay attention to who you’re calling on in class. Whose voice gets more weight? Watch for classroom dynamics that make certain people feel they have the right to speak and others feel they must remain silent. Be sure to encourage every student from kindergarten to PhD candidates to speak up and then make sure you’re listening. It’s wonderful how much weight we give to the voices of men and boys. Women should be afforded the same courtesy. Women’s success doesn’t just come from hiring women or making sure we are paid the same for doing the same work. It comes from making sure every woman, from the time she is a little girl, is given the message that she has worth, and that if she works hard enough, she can achieve her dreams. Let’s not tell our girls that they are pretty flowers who might crumble when life knocks them down. Let’s give them the message that life can be hard, but they can work harder, and if they do, success will be theirs. Eliza VanCort is an in-demand consultant, speaker, and writer on communications, career and workplace issues, and women’s empowerment. The founder of The Actor’s Workshop of Ithaca, she is also a Cook House Fellow at Cornell University, an advisory board member of the Performing Arts for Social Change, a Diversity Crew partner, and a member of Govern For America’s League of Innovators. Her first book, A Woman’s Guide to Claiming Space: Stand Tall. Raise Your Voice. Be Heard., publishes May 11, 2021.

Read More

Spotlight

UNESP

UNESP, acronym for Universidade Estadual Paulista (São Paulo State University), is a public university system in the State of São Paulo. It is part of the state’s public higher education system, which also includes University of Campinas (Unicamp), University of São Paulo (USP) and São Paulo State Technological College (Fatec). São Paulo State University has a combined student body of almost 40,000 students spread by its 23 campuses. The first of them is the Araraquara Pharmacy and Odontology Faculty, founded in 1923 and incorporated by the State of São Paulo in 1956. Before the university’s official foundation in 1976, its original twelve campuses were public independent faculties. UNESP is the most successful multi-campus university system within Brazil. It is also the country’s second largest one, comprising 33 faculties or institutes, 30 libraries, 2 hospitals, 3 animal hospitals, 5 farms and 7 complementary units.

Events