Bar exam failures point to problems in university education

Bitange ndemo | January 29, 2018

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The report of the Task Force on Legal Sector Reforms (TSLSR), chaired by prominent lawyer and senior counsel Fred Ojiambo, established that more students from three top public universities fail to make it through the Kenya School of Law (KSL) standardised examinations than those from other institutions offering law degrees. The shocking findings are likely a result of system failure. To correct the situation, we need a review of the entire education system. To fully comprehend what I mean by system, I use a theoretical explanation given by biologist Ludwig von Bertalanffy, who, in the 1930s, came up with a General Systems Theory and defined it as “a set of related components that work together in a particular environment to perform whatever functions are required to achieve the system's objective”.

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Six Red Marbles (SRM) is the largest provider of editorial content development, project management, production services, and Learning Experience Design in the United States. Our business is built to excel across services, including curriculum design, course/content development, and media development.SRM delivers high-quality educational programs at scale and has years of experience developing custom materials and assessments that can align with any educational standard. We have developed thousands of interactive learning programs for schools, publishers, universities, and more with the support of our global network of subject matter experts.

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Article | June 21, 2021

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Spotlight

Six Red Marbles

Six Red Marbles (SRM) is the largest provider of editorial content development, project management, production services, and Learning Experience Design in the United States. Our business is built to excel across services, including curriculum design, course/content development, and media development.SRM delivers high-quality educational programs at scale and has years of experience developing custom materials and assessments that can align with any educational standard. We have developed thousands of interactive learning programs for schools, publishers, universities, and more with the support of our global network of subject matter experts.

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