'Backpack Full of Cash' Documentary Fuels Controversy Over School Choice

| October 12, 2017

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The filmmakers behind a documentary that defends the public school system and is critical of market-based reforms are not backing down from criticisms from a prominent school choice advocate. "Jeanne Allen's attacks make me think that our film is having an effect; it's getting noticed," said Sarah Mondale, the director and producer of "Backpack Full of Cash." The 93-minute film has been shown at film festivals and community screenings over the last year, but it gained fresh attention this month when Allen, the founder and CEO of the Center for Education Reform, publicly criticized the filmmakers, saying they misled her about their purposes for interviewing her and turned a phrase of hers about the portability of per-pupil aid into the title of a film that is against school choice.

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Indigo Education Company

Our mission is to help all schools, educators, and students realize their full potential through non-academic data and personalized education. Schools thrive when students are engaged, leadership is motivated, and educators construct the bridges for change. Indigo provides schools the consulting, training, and data they need to align these key stakeholders and ultimately drive personalized learning.

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