6 Online Tools To Improve Learning Infographic

| February 16, 2018

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This online tool is not solely targeted towards education: it is great for social learning and it is used to actively engage students in an after-school discussion with one another. This teaches them to become open-minded and exchange prospectives.This ever-famous tool isn’t just used to stream unrelated videos, as it is popularly known for. It also entertains specific educational channels purposely targeted at teachers and students. teachers can upload tutorials so that students can have access wherever they are.

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Lee College

The primary purpose of Lee College is to provide quality instruction to support student learning. Through a variety of programs and services, Lee College prepares students for success in higher education or employment. Lee College also provides a broad-based program of extension courses, distance education, adult education, continuing education, and community service.

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eLearning Gamification: Its Role, Effectiveness, and Open edX Applications

Article | November 4, 2020

Gamification in eLearning is a must-have way to make training more effective and engaging. But how do you implement it for the Open edX platform? In this post, we share some recommendations and examples. Using the game elements, eLearning gamification, provides an effective, informal learning environment and leads to a more engaging learning experience, facilitating better knowledge retention. It is important to mention that gamification tools are based on psychological behavior that governs our everyday decisions and provides a strong platform to share achievements, manage work progress, and build competition. These factors make gamification a powerful tool for learner engagement.

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5 Ways to Help Women Achieve Educational Success

Article | March 7, 2021

While the pandemic continues to wreak havoc on our economy, women continue to be disproportionately impacted. Now is the time to look at the long game. What changes can society make in order to insure that when the next big crisis happens, women don’t bear the brunt of it. Education, of course, has always been on the front line of changing societal disparities. However, much of the time we don’t look at the root causes of why young women underperform in certain areas. Below are five ways we can position women for educational success, from girlhood to the moment they walk into their first job. If you are a teacher, give this list to the parents you work with. Help them set the tone now so our girls grow up ready to take on the world. DON’T TELL ME I’M PRETTY Little girls, from the time they are young, are praised for how beautiful they are.  We talk to girls about how they look and boys about what they do. This escalates when little girls hit puberty. This is when girls start deriving their social capital from their looks and their grades start to tank. Fight this trend by praising young women for what they do. Don’t say, “You’re so beautiful!” Instead say, “I love how curious you are about the solar system! You’re such an interesting person to talk to!”   DON’T TELL ME I’M SMART This sounds a little bit strange, but often little boys are praised for their hard work and girls are praised for their inherent intelligence. The problem with this is that when a little girl doesn’t do well she thinks it has to do with how smart she is rather than her work ethic. Her failures become a referendum on her intelligence.  Say, “Wow, you really worked hard” rather than, “Wow, you’re so smart!” You can always work harder, but you can’t change the brains you were born with!    DON’T BE TOO NICE TO ME When young women struggle in the sciences or STEM, often parents try to protect their feelings.  This can take the form of telling young women who are struggling that perhaps their major is just too hard --maybe they should do something that makes their life a little easier. Boys get the message not to give up - girls get the message to take the path of least resistance. Don’t coddle your girls. Hold them to the same tough standard you have with your boys.   DON’T SEE ME ONLY AS A GIRL OR A WOMAN Understand that if you are trying to support women you cannot do that in a White Woman vacuum. If a young woman you know is struggling, look at the other issues that might be intersecting. Does she have a disability? Is she a woman of color? Is she the first generation to go to college in her family? Audre Lorde famously said “there is no such thing as a single issue struggle because we do not live single issue lives.“ Make sure you are not treating every woman as if she is the same simply because of her gender. There could be all kinds of intersections that are also impacting her situation.   DO VALUE MY VOICE If you are an educator, pay attention to who you are listening to. Note how you value different voices. The patterns that impact girls and young women follow them throughout their education and into adulthood. Pay attention to who you’re calling on in class. Whose voice gets more weight? Watch for classroom dynamics that make certain people feel they have the right to speak and others feel they must remain silent. Be sure to encourage every student from kindergarten to PhD candidates to speak up and then make sure you’re listening. It’s wonderful how much weight we give to the voices of men and boys. Women should be afforded the same courtesy. Women’s success doesn’t just come from hiring women or making sure we are paid the same for doing the same work. It comes from making sure every woman, from the time she is a little girl, is given the message that she has worth, and that if she works hard enough, she can achieve her dreams. Let’s not tell our girls that they are pretty flowers who might crumble when life knocks them down. Let’s give them the message that life can be hard, but they can work harder, and if they do, success will be theirs. Eliza VanCort is an in-demand consultant, speaker, and writer on communications, career and workplace issues, and women’s empowerment. The founder of The Actor’s Workshop of Ithaca, she is also a Cook House Fellow at Cornell University, an advisory board member of the Performing Arts for Social Change, a Diversity Crew partner, and a member of Govern For America’s League of Innovators. Her first book, A Woman’s Guide to Claiming Space: Stand Tall. Raise Your Voice. Be Heard., publishes May 11, 2021.

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Why e-learning is key to building disaster-proof education

Article | March 18, 2020

We’re only three months into 2020, yet the world has already witnessed enough challenging times to last for the entire year: the massive bushfires in Australia, the volcano eruption and the earthquake in the Philippines, the floods in Jakarta, the powerful storms in the US and Western Europe and, of course, the coronavirus pandemic. I live and teach in the Philippines, a country that is also affected by typhoons about 20 times a year, by monsoon rains that cause flooding and also by man-made disasters such as armed conflicts in some regions. I may be exposed to more disasters than the average educator, but believe me when I say, there are no winners in these situations. Every aspect of life can be — and usually is — negatively impacted by natural disasters. Education makes no exception.

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3 Ways Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Campus Cybersecurity

Article | April 1, 2020

It’s not just the wealth of sensitive data that places higher education institutions at greater risk. Higher ed also tends to be stretched thinner than other industries in terms of vulnerability management and other cybersecurity resources. Higher ed institutions typically lack the capacity to focus on everything they need to, especially given the threat level to student data, says Keith Rajecki, vice president of the public sector, education and research industry solutions group at Oracle.

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Spotlight

Lee College

The primary purpose of Lee College is to provide quality instruction to support student learning. Through a variety of programs and services, Lee College prepares students for success in higher education or employment. Lee College also provides a broad-based program of extension courses, distance education, adult education, continuing education, and community service.

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