5 Steps To Becoming A Training Games Hero

| January 6, 2019

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Most people are champions of curiosity and thrive on imagination, exploration, competition, and rewards. It just so happens that each of these adjectives align well with the fundamentals of training games.Games have been around for thousands of years and have consistently engaged learners with content on a much deeper level than passive instruction (lectures, videos, reading, etc.). Over the past decade, studies conducted by Harvard, MIT, and The Federation of American Scientists have linked educational games to significantly enhanced learning. In a study conducted by The Federation of American Scientists, they stated that people remember only 10% of what we read, 20% of what we hear, 50% of what we hear if we watch someone demonstrate it, and 90% if we do it ourselves. Games forces us to try things out ourselves and as a result drive learning material into a player's (or in the case of education, learner’s) long-term memory, ensuring that content is successfully retained and accessible in the future.Despite the benefits of education games, some educators appear like a deer in headlights when given the opportunity to create a game. Below are 5 tips for every educator to consider when implementing games in their classroom.

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StudyPad

StudyPad's vision is to transform K-12 learning by making it fun and personalized for every child and to prepare them for skills required in 21st-century. StudyPad is uniquely poised to harness the rapid growth in the education technology space using the backdrop of the ubiquitous adoption of smartphones, tablets, AR and VR.StudyPad's flagship product Splash Math is transforming the way elementary school children in grades K-5 learn and study math through a highly engaging, and personalized program. Splash Math is available across all digital platforms (iOS, Desktops, Android) and has been used by more than 18 Million students worldwide. It has won many awards and has been featured by Apple multiple times.

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Spotlight

StudyPad

StudyPad's vision is to transform K-12 learning by making it fun and personalized for every child and to prepare them for skills required in 21st-century. StudyPad is uniquely poised to harness the rapid growth in the education technology space using the backdrop of the ubiquitous adoption of smartphones, tablets, AR and VR.StudyPad's flagship product Splash Math is transforming the way elementary school children in grades K-5 learn and study math through a highly engaging, and personalized program. Splash Math is available across all digital platforms (iOS, Desktops, Android) and has been used by more than 18 Million students worldwide. It has won many awards and has been featured by Apple multiple times.

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