3 Ways to Deliver Microlearning as Part of Your Blended Learning Strategy

| July 29, 2018

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Microlearning reinforces retention, promoting better utilization of training time – both for trainers and trainees. There are a number of options when you want to deliver microlearning assets as part of your blended learning strategy. Have a look at our infographic to know the three best ways to deliver microlearning to enhance your blended learning strategy.

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Teachstone

Teachstone® was founded in 2008 to deliver the Classroom Assessment Scoring System® (CLASS®) nationwide and around the globe. Developed through years of research, the CLASS observation tool measures the interactions between teachers and children, which have been shown to drive learning and lifelong achievement. Teachstone helps organizations conduct classroom observations and provide professional development so that teachers improve and children learn more. Our online subscription service, myTeachstone, simplifies CLASS implementation by combining observation data with a robust library of CLASS resources and professional development. We also offer research-based, intensive coaching programs.

OTHER ARTICLES

3 Ways Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Campus Cybersecurity

Article | April 1, 2020

It’s not just the wealth of sensitive data that places higher education institutions at greater risk. Higher ed also tends to be stretched thinner than other industries in terms of vulnerability management and other cybersecurity resources. Higher ed institutions typically lack the capacity to focus on everything they need to, especially given the threat level to student data, says Keith Rajecki, vice president of the public sector, education and research industry solutions group at Oracle.

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The Role of IT in Education: How Tech Leaders Are Taking Charge in Higher Ed

Article | April 1, 2020

This pervasive attitude translates to a lack of action at the boardroom level: As noted by CIO, just 29 percent of CIOs are full-time boardroom members, despite a 71 percent jump in the total number of technology C-suite positions over the past few years. According to Damian Doyle, assistant vice president of enterprise infrastructure solutions at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, this also holds true at many colleges and universities.

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A Vision of AI for Joyful Education

Article | April 1, 2020

Many look to AI-powered tools to address the need to scale high-quality education and with good reason. A surge in educational content from online courses, expanded access to digital devices, and the contemporary renaissance in AI seem to provide the pieces necessary to deliver personalized learning at scale. However, technology has a poor track record for solving social issues without creating unintended harm. What negative effects can we predict, and how can we refine the objectives of AI researchers to account for such unintended consequences?

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Back to school after lockdown – tips from an NHS Psychologist

Article | April 1, 2020

Since some schools across the UK have started to re-open in phases, it’s opened up a whole new set of questions for families. What will it be like for our kids? How will my child adjust to school after months at home? As well as adjusting academically to full-time education again, the emotional impact will be big too. We spoke to NHS Senior Clinical Psychologist, Dr Shreena Ghelani, about how parents can help their get kids ready to return to school, whenever that might be. Here’s what she had to say: Prepare in advance Before it’s time for them to go back, keep school in the minds of your kids – drive past the school if you can so that they can see that it’s still there. When they’ve been given a return date, treat it like the beginning of the school year. Do a test run of getting ready in the morning, make sure school uniform fits, practice packing bags and walking the route to school. For younger children, they may need a settling in period again – parents may have to come into the classroom and ensure their child is settled. For teenagers – use the time while they’re still at home to keep their friendships alive by video call etc. This will help make returning back to their peer group feel less unfamiliar. One step at a time Even when school re starts, you may find that children are more tired than usual by the extra demands and sensory stimulation placed on them. Ease them back in to their routine gently and wait to start other activities (clubs and activities) in a few weeks time. Manage expectations When the time comes, you’ll find you’ll feel less stressed if you know there will be bumps in the road. Allow enough space and time in a new schedule for any hiccups so that you’re not having to manage too many demands (i.e batch cook dinners before hand, don’t agree to extra activities or if possible, adopt flexible working hours). Try to notice if you’re feeling anxious about the return to school in any way and if so, spend some time thinking about it and unpicking it. If children pick up on your anxieties they may feel anxious too. Managing worry and anxiety If you know your child might struggle with going back to school, try developing a toolbox of things they can do when they are worried at school. This might include a song to sing to them selves, visualising a calm place, some affirmation cards, practicing a breathing techniques and identifying safe staff they can tell. You can make this box together and the child can take some bits with them to school. Speak to your children about the impact of Coronavirus Let children know that it is likely that other families have been impacted by the virus (whether that’s key worker parents working hard, or family bereavements). Encourage your child to be patient with and kind to other children. Talk to them about what they might still be expected to do – not hug friends, wash their hands often, not share food or toys etc. For any children with special educational needs, they might need adaptations made for them. This might include visiting the school while it’s empty to familiarise them with the space, a video call with their teacher or a more phased return than other pupils – whatever’s best for them.

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Spotlight

Teachstone

Teachstone® was founded in 2008 to deliver the Classroom Assessment Scoring System® (CLASS®) nationwide and around the globe. Developed through years of research, the CLASS observation tool measures the interactions between teachers and children, which have been shown to drive learning and lifelong achievement. Teachstone helps organizations conduct classroom observations and provide professional development so that teachers improve and children learn more. Our online subscription service, myTeachstone, simplifies CLASS implementation by combining observation data with a robust library of CLASS resources and professional development. We also offer research-based, intensive coaching programs.

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